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Jeremy Corbyn risks climate change activist fury after easing target

<h2>Jeremy Corbyn risks climate change activist fury after watering down a target to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2030 as he unveils his general election manifesto</h2>
<ul><li><strong>Labour conference voted in September to hit net zero carbon emissions by 2030</strong></li><li><strong>But manifesto commits to making 'substantial majority' of reductions by 2030</strong></li></ul>
<p>Jeremy Corbyn today risked activist fury after watering down a commitment to tackling climate change in the Labour Party's 2019 general election manifesto.</p>
<p>The party's annual conference in September backed plans to commit Labour to working 'towards a path to net zero carbon emissions by 2030'. </p>
<p>But Mr Corbyn's new blueprint for the country only commits to 'achieve the substantial majority of our emissions reductions by 2030'. </p>
<p>The less exacting target is unlikely to go down well with climate change campaigners but will be welcomed by some union chiefs. </p>
<img class="aligncenter" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/21/14/21294566-7711051-image-a-24_1574346776548.jpg" height="421" width="634">
<p>Jeremy Corbyn, pictured launching his general election manifesto in Birmingham today, has committed Labour to achieving the 'substantial majority' of carbon emissions reductions by 2030</p>
<p>The latter had urged the Labour leadership to water down the pledge amid fears that the original one would have forced major job losses, particularly in the energy industry. </p>
<p>The manifesto, unveiled by Mr Corbyn at an event in Birmingham this morning, states: 'Labour will kick-start a Green Industrial Revolution that will create one million jobs in the UK to transform our industry, energy, transport, agriculture and our buildings, while restoring nature.</p>
<p>'Our Green New Deal aims to achieve the substantial majority of our emissions reductions by 2030 in a way that is evidence-based, just and that delivers an economy that serves the interests of the many, not the few.'</p>
<p>Despite changing the target, the party's manifesto does have a strong focus on the environment as Mr Corbyn tries to see off an electoral threat from the Green Party. </p>
<p>The manifesto also contains ambitions to put the UK on track for a 'net zero' energy system within the 2030s and for British food production to reach net zero carbon by 2040 – which is in line with the farming sector's plans.</p>
<p>Labour's overall pledge on carbon emissions is more ambitious than the Liberal Democrats' commitment for a new legally binding target to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2045, or the Tories' existing 2050 target which became law in the summer.</p>
<p>Labour says it's plans will be funded through a 'green transformation fund' worth £250 billion. </p>
<p>That cash will be used to produce the shift to a green economy, funding renewable energy sources and low-carbon energy. </p>
<p>The money would also be spent on making transport more sustainable and to repair damage done to wildlife and the environment.   </p>
<p>The manifesto also contains a proposal to impose a windfall tax on oil companies to help to cover the costs of climate damage. </p>
<p>Labour is also proposing an immediate and permanent ban on fracking. </p>
<p>Meanwhile, it confirms previous pledges to upgrade almost all of the UK's 27 million homes to the highest energy-efficiency standards and to build thousands of new offshore and onshore wind turbines.   </p>
Source: <a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7711051/Jeremy-Corbyn-risks-climate-change-activist-fury-watering-key-target.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Read Full Article</a>

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Jeremy Corbyn risks climate change activist fury after easing target

<h2>Jeremy Corbyn risks climate change activist fury after watering down a target to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2030 as he unveils his general election manifesto</h2>
<ul><li><strong>Labour conference voted in September to hit net zero carbon emissions by 2030</strong></li><li><strong>But manifesto commits to making 'substantial majority' of reductions by 2030</strong></li></ul>
<p>Jeremy Corbyn today risked activist fury after watering down a commitment to tackling climate change in the Labour Party's 2019 general election manifesto.</p>
<p>The party's annual conference in September backed plans to commit Labour to working 'towards a path to net zero carbon emissions by 2030'. </p>
<p>But Mr Corbyn's new blueprint for the country only commits to 'achieve the substantial majority of our emissions reductions by 2030'. </p>
<p>The less exacting target is unlikely to go down well with climate change campaigners but will be welcomed by some union chiefs. </p>
<img class="aligncenter" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/21/14/21294566-7711051-image-a-24_1574346776548.jpg" height="421" width="634">
<p>Jeremy Corbyn, pictured launching his general election manifesto in Birmingham today, has committed Labour to achieving the 'substantial majority' of carbon emissions reductions by 2030</p>
<p>The latter had urged the Labour leadership to water down the pledge amid fears that the original one would have forced major job losses, particularly in the energy industry. </p>
<p>The manifesto, unveiled by Mr Corbyn at an event in Birmingham this morning, states: 'Labour will kick-start a Green Industrial Revolution that will create one million jobs in the UK to transform our industry, energy, transport, agriculture and our buildings, while restoring nature.</p>
<p>'Our Green New Deal aims to achieve the substantial majority of our emissions reductions by 2030 in a way that is evidence-based, just and that delivers an economy that serves the interests of the many, not the few.'</p>
<p>Despite changing the target, the party's manifesto does have a strong focus on the environment as Mr Corbyn tries to see off an electoral threat from the Green Party. </p>
<p>The manifesto also contains ambitions to put the UK on track for a 'net zero' energy system within the 2030s and for British food production to reach net zero carbon by 2040 – which is in line with the farming sector's plans.</p>
<p>Labour's overall pledge on carbon emissions is more ambitious than the Liberal Democrats' commitment for a new legally binding target to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2045, or the Tories' existing 2050 target which became law in the summer.</p>
<p>Labour says it's plans will be funded through a 'green transformation fund' worth £250 billion. </p>
<p>That cash will be used to produce the shift to a green economy, funding renewable energy sources and low-carbon energy. </p>
<p>The money would also be spent on making transport more sustainable and to repair damage done to wildlife and the environment.   </p>
<p>The manifesto also contains a proposal to impose a windfall tax on oil companies to help to cover the costs of climate damage. </p>
<p>Labour is also proposing an immediate and permanent ban on fracking. </p>
<p>Meanwhile, it confirms previous pledges to upgrade almost all of the UK's 27 million homes to the highest energy-efficiency standards and to build thousands of new offshore and onshore wind turbines.   </p>
Source: <a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7711051/Jeremy-Corbyn-risks-climate-change-activist-fury-watering-key-target.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Read Full Article</a>

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Jeremy Corbyn risks climate change activist fury after easing target

<h2>Jeremy Corbyn risks climate change activist fury after watering down a target to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2030 as he unveils his general election manifesto</h2>
<ul><li><strong>Labour conference voted in September to hit net zero carbon emissions by 2030</strong></li><li><strong>But manifesto commits to making 'substantial majority' of reductions by 2030</strong></li></ul>
<p>Jeremy Corbyn today risked activist fury after watering down a commitment to tackling climate change in the Labour Party's 2019 general election manifesto.</p>
<p>The party's annual conference in September backed plans to commit Labour to working 'towards a path to net zero carbon emissions by 2030'. </p>
<p>But Mr Corbyn's new blueprint for the country only commits to 'achieve the substantial majority of our emissions reductions by 2030'. </p>
<p>The less exacting target is unlikely to go down well with climate change campaigners but will be welcomed by some union chiefs. </p>
<img class="aligncenter" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/21/14/21294566-7711051-image-a-24_1574346776548.jpg" height="421" width="634">
<p>Jeremy Corbyn, pictured launching his general election manifesto in Birmingham today, has committed Labour to achieving the 'substantial majority' of carbon emissions reductions by 2030</p>
<p>The latter had urged the Labour leadership to water down the pledge amid fears that the original one would have forced major job losses, particularly in the energy industry. </p>
<p>The manifesto, unveiled by Mr Corbyn at an event in Birmingham this morning, states: 'Labour will kick-start a Green Industrial Revolution that will create one million jobs in the UK to transform our industry, energy, transport, agriculture and our buildings, while restoring nature.</p>
<p>'Our Green New Deal aims to achieve the substantial majority of our emissions reductions by 2030 in a way that is evidence-based, just and that delivers an economy that serves the interests of the many, not the few.'</p>
<p>Despite changing the target, the party's manifesto does have a strong focus on the environment as Mr Corbyn tries to see off an electoral threat from the Green Party. </p>
<p>The manifesto also contains ambitions to put the UK on track for a 'net zero' energy system within the 2030s and for British food production to reach net zero carbon by 2040 – which is in line with the farming sector's plans.</p>
<p>Labour's overall pledge on carbon emissions is more ambitious than the Liberal Democrats' commitment for a new legally binding target to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2045, or the Tories' existing 2050 target which became law in the summer.</p>
<p>Labour says it's plans will be funded through a 'green transformation fund' worth £250 billion. </p>
<p>That cash will be used to produce the shift to a green economy, funding renewable energy sources and low-carbon energy. </p>
<p>The money would also be spent on making transport more sustainable and to repair damage done to wildlife and the environment.   </p>
<p>The manifesto also contains a proposal to impose a windfall tax on oil companies to help to cover the costs of climate damage. </p>
<p>Labour is also proposing an immediate and permanent ban on fracking. </p>
<p>Meanwhile, it confirms previous pledges to upgrade almost all of the UK's 27 million homes to the highest energy-efficiency standards and to build thousands of new offshore and onshore wind turbines.   </p>
Source: <a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7711051/Jeremy-Corbyn-risks-climate-change-activist-fury-watering-key-target.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Read Full Article</a>

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Jeremy Corbyn wants to ban PRIVATE JETS as Labour launches election vow to clamp down on country’s billionaires

JEREMY Corbyn plans to ban private jets as he launches his election vow to clamp down the country’s billionaires.

Labour will consult with industry chiefs about a date for phasing out the use of fossil-fuel private planes if it gets into No10.

PLANE WRONG

Andy McDonald, the opposition spokesman for the transport sector, said the party was examining a damning report on banning private jets very closely.

He added that the document, by the Common Wealth think, made a “very convincing argument”.

Mr McDonald said: “Why is the government enabling billionaires to trash the climate when it’s the rest of us who will suffer the consequences?

Why is the government enabling billionaires to trash the climate when it’s the rest of us who will suffer the consequences?

“In just a few years’ time it will be possible for these journeys to be made by electric aircraft – so long as government puts in place the right incentives.

“Labour will examine these proposals closely and consult with industry on the introduction of a phase out date for the use of fossil fuel private jets.”

The private jet pledge comes after a Labour MP said he did not want any Brits to be billionaires.

BAN BILLIONAIRES

Lloyd Russell-Moyle told BBC Radio 5 live: “I think we should have a system where everyone is able to live well and wealthy.

“I don't want this country to work for billionaires. I want it to work for ordinary and normal people."

I don't want this country to work for billionaires. I want it to work for ordinary and normal people.

Mr Russell-Moyle, the Kemptown and Peacehaven MP, also backed his party’s vow to scrap all private schools and force them to sell their playing fields.

Fee-paying schools will lose their multi-billion pound tax breaks and be ordered to sell off their buildings under the radical plans.

And as part of their shake-up of education, Labour also vowed to abolish the schools inspector Ofsted.

Mr Russell-Moyle said: “There is a long-term aim of the Labour Party, that I support, that no one should have to pay for their education.

“That education at all schools should be free at the point of delivery. And that's what everyone should be able to have."

'COMPLETE BUFFOON'

Labour’s pledge to ban private jets and clampdown on billionaires comes after two Brit golf stars blasted Mr Corbyn for attacking the country’s wealthy.

Millionaire golf legends Ian Poulter and Lee Westwood slammed the Labour leader after he said “in a fair society there would be no billionaires and no one would live in poverty”.

Mr Poulter, who owns 12 Ferraris and has homes in Florida and Buckinghamshire, branded Mr Corbyn a “complete buffoon”.

He fumed on Twitter: “No one is allowed to be successful. You can't for one minute be serious. Deluded.”

While Fellow golf star Mr Westwood added: “This tweet is not aging well Jezza.”



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Jeremy Corbyn seen at jail wedding of Guildford Four’s Paul Hill

EXCLUSIVE: Never-before-seen photographs show Labour’s Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell at wedding of Guildford Four’s Paul Hill inside Long Lartin top security jail after his wrongful IRA terror conviction

  • Newly-unearthed pictures show the Labour leader and his Shadow Chancellor at Paul Hill’s wedding in prison 
  • In the photos Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell are seen at the wedding at Long Lartin jail, Worcestershire   
  • Hill wed American Marion Serravalli on February 12, 1988 while he was a convicted IRA terrorist sentenced for the 1974 Guildford pub bombings
  • In 1989, a year after the wedding, the Guildford Four were freed when the Court of Appeal ruled that false evidence had been used to convict them
  • Speaking at the time, Mr Corbyn said: ‘Paul Hill is a constituent of mine. I’ve been visiting him for four years. I believe he is innocent and support the fight for his release.’
  • Corbyn was then MP for Islington North and campaigned for their release while also supporting other Irish Republicans at the height of the Troubles

Smiling for the camera beside the bride and groom, these photos show Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell at the prison wedding of a Guildford Four member, a convicted IRA bomber at the time.

The Labour leader and his Shadow Chancellor were in attendance when Paul Hill married on February 12, 1988, behind bars at HMP Long Lartin, in Worcestershire.

The two high-profile politicians were there to show their continued support for Mr Hill one of four men serving nine life sentences for the 1974 Guildford pub bombings, which killed five people. A year later, their convictions were overturned.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn and Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell pose alongside the wedding party at the marriage of Guildford Four member Paul Hill inside Long Lartin top security prison in Worcestershire. The guests in the picture are (l-r):  Katrina Scanlon, Gerry Fitzpatrick, Marion Serravalli, John McDonnell, Tom Barron, Jeremy Corbyn, Conor Foley. Box below

Corbyn and McDonnell were in attendance at the wedding to show their support for Paul Hill, one of four men serving nine life sentences for the 1974 Guildford pub bombings, which killed five people. A year later, their convictions were overturned


Mr Hill’s bride that late Winter day was American Marion Serravalli, whom he met she wrote to him in jail from her home in the US. The ceremony took place in the morning followed by an afternoon reception with wedding cake and a buffet 

It was well documented at the time that Mr Corbyn (pictured last year), MP for Islington since 1983, attended Mr Hill’s wedding ceremony at the jail that was conducted by the prison Governor. Speaking at the time, Mr Corbyn said: ‘Paul Hill is a constituent of mine. I’ve been visiting him for four years. I believe he is innocent and support the fight for his release’

Corbyn campaigned for their release while also supporting other Irish Republicans at the height of the Troubles.

In the extraordinary wedding snaps Corbyn and McDonnell are seen alongside Conor Foley, who had been wrongly suspected of planting a bomb at Chelsea Barracks; Tom Barron, a prominent Republican activist in London; and Gerry Fitzpatrick, a leading Irish Republican campaigner from Dublin who was living in London at the time.

They were all there in their role lobbying to free the ‘Guildford Four’.

Foley, Barron and Fitzpatrick were regulars at the Irish Centre in Islington, north London, a well known Republican stronghold at the time.

PAUL HILL’S WEDDING GUESTS – WHO’S WHO?

1. Katrina Scanlon (Irish Centre, Islington, worker)

2. Gerry Fitzpatrick (Republican activist)

3. Marion Serravalli (bride)

4. John McDonnell

5. Tom Barron (London based Republican activist)

6. Jeremy Corbyn

7. Conor Foley (Republican activist)

A guest at the wedding and a relative of Mr Hill, who did not want to be named, told MailOnline: ‘They were close to Corbyn, McDonnell and other Labour politicians. They were big players in the London Republican movement and very committed to the cause. As Paul’s family, we never knew the full extent of what they got up to but they were very supportive of his case and that’s all we cared about.’

Following Mr Hill’s release, the trio of campaigners went their separate ways. Mr Foley carved out a career in writing and humanitarian work and now spends his time between Britain and Brazil; Mr Barron got a job as a tube driver and is still in the London area while Mr Fitzpatrick returned to Dublin, where he still resides.

Mr Hill’s bride that late Winter day was American Marion Serravalli, whom he met after writing to him in jail from her home in the United States.

The ceremony took place in the morning followed by an afternoon reception. Prison authorities provided the wedding cake and a buffet lunch but it was paid for by Ms Serravalli and some of Mr Hill’s family. Her wedding dress cost £500 while the overall cost of the wedding was £1,500.

The guest list was drawn up by Mr Hill and Ms Serravalli, who selected those who were his fiercest supporters as well as members of his family. All their names and details had to be provided in advance and were closely vetted by authorities. In total, 15 people attended the ceremony, including Mr Hill’s mother, Lily, who flew in from her home in Belfast.

As guests mingled and posed for photographs, they were watched over by prison guards and Special Branch officers. The wedding lunch finished at 4pm and Mr Hill was then taken back to his cell while his bride and guests returned to London.

Speaking to MailOnline from her home in New Jersey, Ms Serravalli, now 63, said the couple were not allowed to be alone together after the wedding, though they were permitted to ‘hold hands and kiss’ before she was hustled away by friends after the ceremony. She returned to the US nine days later.

Recalling their first meeting and subsequent relationship behind bars, she said: ‘Paul arranged for me to stay with his aunt and uncle. He put me on his visitor’s list and we met for the first time in a little room. At first we just were friend, good friends. But it grew into love.

‘Marriage was something we discussed. Paul wanted to wait until he got out of jail – something we both hoped for – and my mother and father thought getting married while he still was in prison was a mistake. But I was in love. I absolutely was in love. 

‘I came back to New Jersey and bought my wedding dress and I bought our rings – matching gold bands with gold beading.’

When she returned to Britain, Mr Hill’s aunt Theresa helped plan the reception. ‘We ordered sandwiches and a fruit cake with icing,’ Ms Serravalli said.


Ms Serravalli, now 63, had flown over for the wedding from her home in New Jersey. Recalling her big day, she said the couple were not allowed to be alone together after the ceremony, though they were permitted to ‘hold hands and kiss’ before she was hustled away by friends afterwards. She returned to the US nine days later

Ms Serravalli (pictured with her groom Mr Hill on on her 1988 wedding day) told MailOnline: ‘Marriage was something we discussed. Paul wanted to wait until he got out of jail – something we both hoped for – and my mother and father thought getting married while he still was in prison was a mistake. But I was in love. I absolutely was in love.’


Ms Serravalli (left) said she knew Mr Hill was innocent since by the time she wrote to him, an IRA cell the Balcombe Street gang said it plotted the bombings. ‘To me there was never a doubt and it was the same with Jeremy Corbyn (right),’ she said.

‘Paul and I both are Catholics and a priest married us in the prison chapel.’ None of her family attended.

‘My mother was scared to fly,’ she explained. ‘The wedding party consisted of Paul’s family and friends.’

One guest said: ‘Given the circumstances it was a lovely occasion. Obviously, there was no alcohol there so it wasn’t your usual Irish wedding. Corbyn and McDonnell were an important part of the campaign to free Paul and he was delighted that they were there. He spent a lot of time speaking with them and was very grateful for their support.’

Ms Serravalli said she always knew Hill was innocent since by the time she penned her first letter to him, an IRA cell known as the Balcombe Street gang had taken credit for the bombings.

In 1989, a year after the wedding, Paul Hill (pictured) and the rest of the Guildford Four were freed when the Court of Appeal ruled false evidence had been used to convict them

‘To me there was never a doubt and it was the same with Jeremy,’ she said. ‘I got a lot of prejudice. People would slam doors in my face. But I wasn’t an IRA supporter. My family were Italian. I began writing to Paul after an Irish-American friend of mine who believed he was framed gave me his prison address.’ 

In 1989, a year after the wedding, the Guildford Four were freed when the Court of Appeal ruled that false evidence had been used to convict them. But by then Marion had met someone else and she and Hill were soon divorced.

After his release Mr Hill moved to the US where married Courtney Kennedy, a human rights lawyer and daughter of Bobby Kennedy, whom he met when giving a talk about the miscarriage of justice he had suffered. That marriage broke down in 2006.

Mr Hill and Ms Kennedy had a daughter, Saoirse, who died last month at the age of 22 after a suspected drug overdose.

Although it was well documented at the time that Mr Corbyn attended Mr Hill’s wedding, photos of him there have never been published before.

Mr Hill’s brother Patrick has now decided to release the pictures to MailOnline. 

Speaking at the time, Mr Corbyn, MP for Islington North since 1983, said: ‘Paul Hill is a constituent of mine. I’ve been visiting him for four years. I believe he is innocent and support the fight for his release. And surely everyone has the right to marry, whatever his condition.’

Although Mr Hill was acquitted, he was only one of the IRA prisoners supported by Mr Corbyn, many of whom were guilty.

In 1986, the Labour leader was arrested at a protest showing ‘solidarity’ for Brighton bomber killer Patrick Magee.

He also supported Hugh Doherty, a notorious IRA murderer who was sentenced to 11 life sentences for the massacre of 16 people.

Mr Corbyn repeatedly demanded more lenient prison conditions for Mr Doherty and other IRA convicts.

The controversial Labour MP also supported the notorious IRA bomb maker Dessie Ellis, who was sentenced to 10 years for explosives offences and is thought to have been behind the Hyde Park and Regent’s Park bombs.

Mr Corbyn went on to attend a ceremony in Northern Ireland honouring eight IRA gunmen killed by the SAS.

For his part, Mr McDonnell has received an award from IRA-related groups for his support. In 2015, he was forced to apologise when his comments praising the ‘bombs and bullets’ of the IRA came to light.

In his autobiography called ‘Stolen Years’, Mr Hill revealed his close links and friendship to the now Labour leader.

‘After the 1983 General Election a number of other Labour MPs took up our case. One of the most notable was Jeremy Corbyn, MP for Islington North, in whose constituency I had once lived,’ he said.

‘Jeremy was tireless in his work on behalf of the Guildford Four and visited me several times in prison to discuss my conditions and the case.’

Of the wedding itself, he said: ‘The ceremony took place in the chapel at Long Lartin. The guests were outnumbered by screws and Special Branch men. In these circumstances, it held no magic for me and I was keen to get it over with as quickly as possible.

‘After the vows were exchanged, I was taken back to my cell for a couple of hours while the screws had their lunch. At 2pm I was unlocked and taken to the reception.

After his release from jail, Mr Hill’s marriage collapsed and he moved to the US where he wed human rights lawyer Courtney Kennedy (above), daughter of Bobby Kennedy, whom he met giving a talk about the miscarriage of justice he had suffered

Mr Hill and Ms Kennedy had a daughter, Saoirse, who died last month at the age of 22 after a suspected drug overdose at the Kennedy family compound in Cape Cod. Mr Hill was seen carrying his tragic daughter’s coffin at the funeral last month 


Mr Hill fathered Saoirse after leaving jail in 1989 when his conviction was quashed. He was seen with the Kennedy clan carrying his daughter’s coffin at last month’s funeral. His marriage to Saoirse’s mother Courtney Kennedy broke down in 2006

‘Among the guests were members of my family, and people who helped Errol and Theresa (Smalley, his uncle and aunt) with the campaign – Tom Barron, John McDonnell, Gerry Fitzpatrick, Conor Foley and Richard Wize.

‘It was the first chance I had to talk to them and thank them for the work they had done. Jeremy Corbyn was also present.

‘The reception lasted for two hours. At 4pm I was separated from my wife and guests, and taken back to my cell. I lay on the bed and thought of Marion driving back to London.

‘Some friends of mine had brewed up a batch of hooch, and that night I got drunk. I was glad; it wiped out the feelings I had about the day’s proceedings. They were not happy ones.’

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Jeremy Corbyn ‘was regular writer for hard-Left newspaper’

Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell ‘were regular writers for a hard-Left newspaper which celebrated the IRA’s deadly 1984 bombing of the Tory Party conference in Birmingham

  • Mr Corbyn and Mr McDonnell were both contributors to the Socialist Organiser
  • Newspaper made controversial comments about the 1984 bombing in Brighton
  • A week later, Mr Corbyn hosted two former Irish republican prisoners as guests
  • It led Whip Michael Cocks to scold him for ‘thoughtlessness of the highest order’

Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell were regular writers for a hard-Left newspaper which celebrated the IRA’s deadly bombing of the Tory Party conference in Brighton.

Mr Corbyn remained a leading contributor to Socialist Organiser even after it said – only six days on from the 1984 attack that killed five people – ‘a very large number of people in Britain, though a minority, are sorry that the bomb did not kill Margaret Thatcher and wipe out her Cabinet.’

A week later, Mr Corbyn welcomed two former Irish republican prisoners as guests in the House of Commons, leading Labour Chief Whip Michael Cocks to scold him for ‘thoughtlessness of the highest order’. 


Jeremy Corbyn (left) and John McDonnell (right) for hard-Left newspaper Socialist Organiser which celebrated the IRA’s deadly bombing of the Tory Party conference in Brighton

The Labour Party formally shunned Socialist Organiser in 1990. But within weeks, Mr Corbyn wrote a front-page article opposing the first Gulf War to liberate Kuwait from Saddam Hussein’s forces.

Sean Matgamna, the newspaper’s founder, told The Times that Mr Corbyn ‘had close links with the paper. He wrote for the first five or six years. He wrote frequently.’

Socialist Organiser’s mailing address was the office of the Hornsey Labour Party where Mr Corbyn was chairman.

Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and her husband Denis, leaving the Royal Sussex County Hospital in Brighton after visiting the victims of the IRA bomb explosion which occurred at the hotel in which she was staying

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Corbyn isolated as leading ally Diane Abbott questions Brexit stance

Corbyn increasingly isolated as leading ally Diane Abbott says she is ‘beginning to worry’ about Labour’s continued failure to get off the fence on a second Brexit referendum

  • Shadow home secretary the latest senior figure to apply pressure to Mr Corbyn
  • Remainers want him to stop delaying a final decision on a second referendum
  • They want Labour to call for another public vote and to campaign for Remain 
  • Decision had been due Tuesday but Labour leader pushed it back two weeks
  • John McDonnell told Mr Corbyn his Brexit policy was a ‘slow-moving car crash’ 

Jeremy Corbyn is increasingly isolated over Labour’s Brexit policy as Diane Abbott became the latest of his allies to signal her alarm at the party’s continued indecision over a second referendum. 

The shadow cabinet had been due to decide whether to formally call for a second Brexit vote and whether to campaign to Remain at a crunch meeting earlier this week. 

But a final decision was delayed again as John McDonnell, arguably Mr Corbyn’s most important ally, told the Labour leader it was ‘like a slow-moving car crash’. 

Ms Abbott, the shadow home secretary, today said she had ‘supported Labour’s Brexit strategy so far’ but she was ‘beginning to worry’. 

The Labour Party hemorrhaged votes at the European Parliament elections in May as many of its pro-EU supporters appeared to jump ship in order to back the ‘Stop Brexit’ Lib Dems. 

Many Remain-backing Labour MPs believe the only way to reverse the party’s fortunes is to change tack on Brexit and fully commit to not only giving people another vote on whether to leave the EU but also to campaign to stay. 

Such a move would be welcomed by the majority of the party’s members who back Remain. 

But it would likely have severe consequences in Labour’s Leave-voting northern heartlands and could trigger a number of frontbench resignations from people like party chairman Ian Lavery who are vehemently opposed to another referendum. 

Diane Abbott said today that she was ‘beginning to worry’ about Labour’s Brexit policy

The shadow home secretary is the latest senior figure within the party to openly criticise Labour’s current approach

Jeremy Corbyn has pushed back making a final decision on whether to call for a second referendum by two weeks

Mr Corbyn’s current Brexit policy is to seek a ‘public vote’ – either a general election or a second referendum – on any deal secured by a Conservative government with his preference being a general election. 

But many senior figures in the party want him to back a second referendum in all circumstances and to swing in behind Remain. 

A final decision is now scheduled to be made in two weeks’ time. 

Ms Abbott made her view known as she responded to someone on Twitter who said the were concerned by the party’s continued fence sitting on the issue. 

She said: ‘Like you I have supported Labour’s Brexit strategy so far. But like you I am beginning to worry…’

Her comments are likely to raise eyebrows within Mr Corbyn’s inner circle given the fact she has long been one of his closest political allies. 

However, one shadow cabinet minister told MailOnline Mr Corbyn ‘is doing exactly the right thing’. 

‘It would be madness to take a position on this now,’ they said. 

‘We should put off a decision until it needs to be made. We are in opposition, not government.

‘We need to avoid pitting our Remain areas against our Leave heartlands.’ 

Pro-Remain campaigners said Ms Abbott would not be alone in her concern about Labour’s Brexit policy. 

Naomi Smith, the Best for Britain campaign group CEO, said: ‘Labour needs to be the stop Brexit party, it’s as simple as that. 

‘Labour members and voters are crying out for the party to oppose Brexit. 

‘Diane Abbott won’t be the only Labour MP worrying about the party’s unclear position on this. 

‘The party is bleeding remain support and needs to act quickly to stop the rot.’ 

Labour Remainer Margaret Beckett fired a broadside at Mr Corbyn’s top team yesterday as she claimed they didn’t ‘give a toss’ about what the British people want on Brexit.

Dame Margaret Beckett claimed Mr Corbyn’s inner circle were preventing him from moving Labour to back Remain – a claim denied by his spokesman

The former foreign secretary and People’s Vote backer accused senior figures of even being prepared to support a No Deal Brexit. 

Dame Margaret told the BBC: ‘I’m beginning to think that some of them do actually want Britain to leave the EU no matter what.

‘They don’t give a toss about what the British people now want or what Labour members think is in the country’s interests.

‘They just are determined to try and make sure we don’t do anything to impede Britain leaving, if necessary with no deal.’

Mr Corbyn’s spokesman dismissed Dame Margaret’s accusations as ‘laughable’. 

He said: ‘I think we’re all familiar with the trope of good kings and their bad advisers. 

‘The idea that Jeremy doesn’t make his own decisions or decide what he wants to do is laughable.’

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Jeremy Corbyn will suffer 'his Iraq moment' if Labour doesn't back second referendum in Euro Election pledges, claims one of his own MPs

JEREMY CORBYN will suffer “his Iraq moment” if Labour fails to back a second referendum in its Euro Election manifesto, a senior MP claims.

Ben Bradshaw yesterday said Labour would “haemorrhage” members, activists and MEPs if its ruling National Executive Council (NEC) fails to agree to call for a confirmatory vote at a crunch manifesto meeting tomorrow.

Referring to the exodus suffered by Tony Blair in the early 2000s over the Iraq War, Mr Bradshaw said: “It will be like Jeremy Corbyn’s Iraq moment.

“Tuesday’s NEC is the most important in our party’s history.”

The blast came as deputy leader Tom Watson appealed directly to supporters to bombard NEC members with their demands for a second referendum.

And he was backed by Momentum co-founder Jon Lansman.

About 100 Labour MPs and MEs want the promise put in the manifesto.

But Shadow Business Minister Rebecca Long Bailey highlighted the civil war by saying a referendum wasn’t a “red line” in Brexit talks with the Government.

“We have to be flexible in where we move,” she said.

On Saturday, Jeremy Corbyn said: “We would prefer to have a General Election but failing that if we get (Brexit) agreement we are prepared to consider putting it to a confirmatory vote.”

Tuesday’s crunch meeting comes after Labour admitted it was redrafting European election leaflets after the first ones went off to printers without a Brexit referendum pledge.

Internal polling is thought to warn that Labour has no chance of winning 75 target seats if it backs a second referendum or ‘Remain’.




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How old is Jeremy Corbyn, who is his wife Laura Alvarez, what's the Labour Party Leader's constituency and could he be Prime Minister?

JEREMY Corbyn has gone from rebellious backbencher to Prime Minister-in-waiting in a political earthquake that has rocked the Labour party to its foundations.

He has recently been accused of viewing British Jews as a "hostile entity" and siding with anti-Semites among his supporters. Here's the lowdown…

Who is Jeremy Corbyn? What constituency does he represent?

Born in Chippenham, Wilts, in 1949, Corbyn is the youngest of three sons.

After private prep school and state grammar school, he worked briefly at a local newspaper before, at the age of 19, he volunteered in Jamaica for two years.

He then worked as a trade union organiser and was elected a councillor in Haringey, North London, aged 24.

In 1983 Corbyn, 69, was elected as Labour MP for Islington North, the constituency he has represented since.

On his website, Corbyn says: “I remain every bit as determined to fight for a better society today, as I was then."

As a backbench MP he was known as a radical who backed hard-left policies and voted against his own party more than 500 times.

Following Labour’s defeat in the General Election in May 2015, Corbyn announced he was standing as a candidate as party leader.

He was seen as a rank outsider, but stunned Westminster by winning the party leadership in September.

Who is Jeremy Corbyn married to?

Jeremy Corbyn has been married three times.

His third wife, Laura Alvarez, is an ex-banker who is 20 years younger than him.

She met Jeremy Corbyn after he helped sister, Marcela, with a custody battle.

The pair conducted a long distance relationship before marrying in her native Mexico in 2013.

She then moved to London, where she moved into a £1million home in Islington, ditching her career in the financial industry

She now runs a business importing fair trade coffee.

Corbyn was divorced from his second wife, Chilean exile Claudia Bracchitta, in 1999 after 12 years of marriage. They have three sons together.

He was married to his first wife, academic Jane Chapman, from 1974 to 1979.

How did he become Labour leader?

Jeremy Corbyn spent most of his 35-year career as an MP as an obscure backbencher.

But in a remarkable turn of events the bearded throwback leftie was propelled from the political fringe to leading the UK's main opposition party.

Ed Miliband, who lost the General Election against the odds in 2015, decided to open up future leadership contests to the public for a £3 fee.

But instead of drawing in a wide spectrum of society, the opportunity to vote was seized by a hard left faction which later became known as Momentum.

And so with their support the crumpled maverick won the votes.

Corbyn’s low-fi style in contrast to other polished politicians also won him support from young people looking for a no-frills socialist leader.

His leadership was then challenged in 2016 after his lacklustre support for the Remain camp in the Brexit vote.

After a no-confidence vote was supported by 172 Labour MPs to 40 against, a leadership battle began between Corbyn and Welsh MP Owen Smith.

But after Momentum marshalled support for him, Corbyn actually increased his leadership from 59.5 per cent to 61.8 per cent.

However, after just four years doing the job it was rumoured he was "tired and fed up".

Allies have reportedly claimed he'll soon hand over to another MP.

One Shadow Cabinet member told the Evening Standard: "Corbyn is ready to step down. He wants to step down."

How did Labour perform in the 2017 General Election?

Jeremy Corbyn's Labour increased their number of seats by 31 to 261 after being written off by most observers when Theresa May called the snap election.

Most expected the Prime Minister's big gamble to pay out handsomely with a massive Commons majority for the Tories.

But Labour's turnaround came in a dramatic week in which the party's draft manifesto was leaked to the press, and Mrs May's disastrous launch of the Tories' policy programme.

The public appeared to warm to popular Labour policies.

This included nationalising key industries, spending more on the NHS and education, abolishing university tuition fees, and taxing the top 5 per cent of earners and big corporations to pay for it.

But Mr Corbyn still appeared to be lagging behind Mrs May on the key question of who voters thought was the best leader, until the PM made plans for a so-called "dementia tax" central to her manifesto pitch, before u-turning on the policy.

Some supporters claimed Corbyn was the real winner, although Labour were still more than 50 seats behind the Tories.

What is the anti-Semitism row?

The Labour party has come under fire for failing to rid its ranks of anti-Semitism as the row continues to deepen.

Jeremy Corbyn is under increasing pressure, including from his own MPs, to take urgent action to stamp out anti-Semitism within Labour.

Protests have taken place over the party's failure to stamp out the issue after a 2016 internal inquiry was branded a “whitewash”.

Mr Corbyn has also been slammed over his commitment to tackling anti-Semitism – and further stoked criticism after meeting controversial far-left Jewish group Jewdas on Sunday,  April 2.

He joined a Passover Seder hosted by the radical group which has faced criticism from mainstream Jewish organisations and wasn't sorry he went, claiming he had a "lovely time".

The group has suggested that allegations of anti-Semitism within Labour are a political plot aimed at discrediting the party.

It has also described Israel as “a steaming pile of sewage which needs to be properly disposed of”.

The Labour leader has acknowledged that concerns about prejudice against Jewish people were "genuine" and says he will not tolerate anti-Semitism in the party.

Will Jeremy Corbyn be Prime Minister?

The next general election is not due until 2022 – although in today's topsy-turvy politics, no one would rule out an earlier ballot.

A fresh election could be sparked if Theresa May lost a no-confidence vote in the Commons, for instance.

Jeremy Corbyn would become Prime Minister if Labour won a majority or were able to form a minority government or coalition.

An ICM opinion poll on March 20 had Labour on 41 per cent, three points behind the Tories.

That gap could easily close, as before the last election Labour were trailing by 24 points but eventually won around 40 per cent of votes.

Bookies currently rate Mr Corbyn the 5/1 second favourite to be Britain's next PM, behind Tory Brexiteer Boris Johnson at 9/2.

How many homes does Jeremy Corbyn own?

Jeremy Corbyn is believed to own one house.

The Labour leader lives in Islington in North London.

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Corbyn forced to suspend Chris Williamson after 38 MPs revolt

Corbyn’s new low: Labour leader tries to save close ally in vile anti-Semitism storm – only to be shamed into suspending him by 38 of his own furious MPs

  • Jeremy Corbyn was forced to suspend ally Chris Williamson after revolt
  • Some 38 moderate MPs pressed for Mr Williamson’s removal in a letter
  • Labour had initially refused to withdraw the whip from Chris Williamson
  • Mr Corbyn is believed to have intervened personally to block his suspension 

A humiliated Jeremy Corbyn was forced to suspend a close ally yesterday after a revolt by his MPs.

Labour had initially refused to withdraw the whip from Chris Williamson, even though he had said the party was ‘too apologetic’ about anti-Semitism. Mr Corbyn is believed to have intervened personally to block his suspension.

Some 38 moderate MPs then pressed for Mr Williamson’s removal, putting their demands in a letter. Deputy leader Tom Watson also intervened, condemning the decision to only ‘investigate’ the remarks.

A former frontbencher and MP for Derby North, Chris Williamson (left) is a long-time ally of Mr Corbyn

The mass revolt sparked a review by party general secretary Jennie Formby, who suspended Mr Williamson hours later. The move angered hard-Left supporters of Mr Corbyn, some of whom said they would quit the party.

On another calamitous day for the Labour leader, who has already lost a string of MPs over his failure to tackle anti-Semitism:

  • A second recording emerged of Mr Williamson saying he had never seen an example of anti-Semitism in Labour;
  • Following his suspension, he was found by a camera crew outside a pub where he vowed ‘to clear his name’.
  • Labour MP Margaret Hodge, who branded Mr Corbyn an anti-Semite, said the party left her, as a Jew, feeling ‘more frightened than I have ever been’;
  • New figures showed that trade union donations to Labour hit a new low in 2018, with the £1.6million in donations over the fourth quarter outstripped by £2.1million received from public funds.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn leaving the Houses of Parliament in Westminster, London yesterday


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Speech: Chris Williamson filmed at the Momentum meeting in Sheffield

A former frontbencher and MP for Derby North, Mr Williamson is a long-time ally of Mr Corbyn. Just last month the Labour leader told the Derby Telegraph: ‘Chris Williamson is a very good, very effective Labour MP. He is a very strong anti-racist campaigner. He is not anti-Semitic in any way.’

MPs erupted in fury yesterday after a recording of Mr Williamson was obtained by the Yorkshire Post late on Tuesday which showed the MP at a Momentum meeting in Sheffield saying the party had been ‘too apologetic’ about anti-Semitism.

He said: ‘The party that has done more to stand up to racism is now being demonised as a racist, bigoted party.

‘I have got to say I think our party’s response has been partly responsible for that because in my opinion … we have backed off too much, we have given too much ground, we have been too apologetic.’

He was also shown responding to the resignations of nine Labour MPs last week, including the Jewish Labour MP Luciana Berger, by singing the 1980s hit by Kool and the Gang, Celebration.

Another recording acquired by the Jewish Chronicle emerged yesterday morning in which Mr Williamson was shown describing MPs who marched with the Jewish MP Ruth Smeeth as ‘white and privileged’. In the video, he was also shown saying that he had never seen an example of anti-Semitism in Labour, adding that critics had ‘weaponised’ it to condemn the party.

After the row exploded yesterday morning, Mr Williamson was forced to tweet a heavily caveated apology, saying he ‘regretted’ his choice of words, before the party announced an investigation into him for a ‘pattern of behaviour’.

Labour had initially refused to withdraw the whip from Chris Williamson, even though he had said the party was ‘too apologetic’ about anti-Semitism. Mr Corbyn is believed to have intervened personally to block his suspension

The failure to suspend Mr Williamson immediately triggered fierce anger from Labour MPs, union bosses, and Theresa May, who directly challenged Mr Corbyn over the issue at Prime Minister’s Questions.

The backlash was led by Jewish former Labour MP Luciana Berger, who quit the party over what she described as ‘institutional anti-Semitism’ and retweeted the video of Mr Williamson.

She said: ‘This is what I have left behind. It’s toxic. Our country deserves so much better.’

Louise Ellman, a Jewish MP who is rumoured to be considering leaving the party, said: ‘Chris Williamson should be suspended immediately… This is a provocation too far.’ Veteran Jewish Labour MP Dame Margaret Hodge, who was investigated by the party after branding Mr Corbyn a racist and an anti-Semite, demanded action.

She said her reaction was ‘shock, anger and disappointment’ in the week after Miss Berger was forced out of the Labour party.

GMB union boss Tim Roache had also called for Mr Williamson to lose the Labour whip.

Labour’s parliamentary committee called for Mr Williamson to be suspended but said the Leader’s office had initially resisted the move. All ten members of the panel – including Mr Watson – said he should have the whip withdrawn.

And shortly before the decision to suspend Mr Williamson was announced at 5pm, 38 members of the Tribune group of Labour MPs wrote to Miss Formby demanding action.

A party spokesman said: ‘Chris Williamson is suspended from the party, and therefore the whip, pending investigation.’

Asked about the MP’s comments yesterday, Mr Corbyn’s spokesman said they were ‘deeply offensive’ and that ‘downplaying the problem of anti-Semitism makes it harder for us to tackle it’.

The spokesman said Mr Corbyn did not have personal responsibility for withdrawing the whip.

Gideon Falter, chairman of the Campaign Against Antisemitism, said: ‘The suspension of Chris Williamson under duress shows that the Labour Party no longer possesses moral initiative.’  

Even unions paymasters are deserting the party 

Trade union donations to Labour hit a new low in 2018 as even its traditional backers desert the beleaguered party.

The total of £6.5million received from the unions was the lowest since Electoral Commission records started in 2001.

The sum pales in comparison to almost £17million given during the election year of 2017, around £10million in 2016 and £18million in 2015.

Labour received more than £8million a year from unions in non-election years under Ed Miliband’s leadership. The Electoral Commission revealed the donation totals for the final three months of last year, showing Theresa May’s Conservatives taking in almost £7.4million, which was more than four times the amount to Jeremy Corbyn’s party.

James Cleverly, the Tories’ deputy chairman, said: ‘Even Labour’s traditional big union donors appear to be turning their back on Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour.

He blamed it on Corbyn’s ‘failure to deal with anti-Jewish racism’ and his ‘tendency to side with our country’s enemies’.

Leader let off for his trip to terrorists’ graveyard 

Watchdogs have decided not to censure Jeremy Corbyn over his undeclared wreath-laying trip to Tunisia.

Kathryn Stone, the Parliamentary Commissioner for Standards, accepted the Labour leader’s estimate that his two-day trip to a five-star hotel cost just £656 – just fractionally short of the threshold for listing donations. She exonerated him even though he admitted it had ‘not been possible’ to establish the actual cost, which was met by the Tunisian government.

She did find him guilty of not listing one trip which did exceed the £660 threshold for declarations – a visit to New York in April 2014 to attend a nuclear non-proliferation conference for CND. Mr Corbyn apologised ‘unreservedly’ for the error.

The Tunisia trip, during which he visited the cemetery where terror leaders linked to the Munich massacre are buried, attracted huge criticism last year.

The Mail obtained a photograph of the Labour leader holding a wreath a feet away from the graves of terror leaders linked to the 1972 Olympic Games killings.

Sir Alistair Graham, former chairman of the Committee on Standards in Public Life, said he was sceptical about the supposed costs of the trip. 

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Corbyn and his MPs who want to delay Brexit are like squabbling children, Labour veteran blasts

Graham Stringer said his party’s decision to back Yvette Cooper’s amendment was “dangerous” because “nobody would know who was in control” of Brexit.

He also ridiculed Mr Corbyn’s call to rule out a no deal Brexit – comparing it to a trade union boss telling managers that “whatever you do, we won’t go on strike”.

Mr Stringer – a veteran Eurosceptic on Labour's backbenches  – threw his weight behind a no deal Brexit if Theresa May’s deal fails – saying: “It just means complete freedom. So I’m not bothered about no deal."

Appearing as a special guest at the Tory Eurosceptic Bruges Group, Mr Stringer said: "Often in discussing the European Union my colleagues use kindergarten language – they say 'they're our friends, how could they not have our interests at heart?'.

"I think it misunderstands that actually the bureaucrats in Brussels are a self-interested group of people – self-interested in their own survival and perpetuating their growing power and influence across the whole of the European continent."

“It also misunderstands the fact that the European Union do negotiate but they usually come to agreements at the last minute – the 11th hour.

“And that is possible which is why it’s important to send the Prime Minister back to Brussels over the next fortnight because I think that the European Union – one can’t be certain – actually want to come to a deal.”

In an ominous warning for his party he predicted Labour would lose "a lot of seats" if it continued to frustrate Brexit.

And there would be "electoral peril" for the party if Labour officially backed a second referendum, the MP added.



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Ex-Archbishop: Corbyn ‘gives impression he doesn’t like Jewish people’

Jeremy Corbyn gives the impression ‘he is, deep-down, somebody who doesn’t like Jewish people’, says former Archbishop of Canterbury

  • Labour leader has repeatedly been accused of failing to deal with anti-Semitism
  • Lord Carey has now added his voice to those criticising Corbyn over the issue
  • He said Corbyn is failing to condemn members who speak against Jewish people

Former Archbishop of Canterbury Lord Carey has said Jeremy Corbyn appears to dislike Jewish people due to the weakness of his statements on the issue of anti-Semitism

The former Archbishop of Canterbury Lord Carey of Clifton has said Jeremy Corbyn gives the impression that ‘he is, deep-down, somebody who doesn’t like Jewish people’.

The Labour leader has come in for repeated criticism for failing to deal with anti-Semitism in his party.

Now, Lord Carey, who was the head of the Anglican church from 1991 to 2002, has added his voice to the many calling for Labour to get a grip on the issue.

Lord Carey told i24News: ‘The weakness of his statements can give the impression that he is, deep-down, somebody who doesn’t like Jewish people.

‘I hope he might say that’s not the case, but I feel he’s not giving clear leadership to his own party in condemning from within his own ranks people who speak out against Jewish people.

‘I would encourage socialists and those in the Labour party to pay attention to what they say about racism and about the influence of Jews within their own party. I think socialism owes such a lot to Jewish thinkers anyway in the past.’

The criticism comes at a difficult time for Mr Corbyn, with a poll of under-34-year-olds, a key group for Labour, showing only 23% approve of his Brexit strategy, with 37% disapproving.

Yesterday’s Holocaust Memorial Day was marked with growing fears about rising anti-Semitism in the UK.  

There were 1,414 anti-Semitic incidents in 2017, compared with 541 in 2008, according to Community Security Trust.


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Mr Corbyn has been criticised for failing to deal with elements within his party whose sympathy with Palestine have turned into virulent anti-Israeli feelings.

Last year, Britain’s three leading Jewish newspapers, which warned of the ‘existential threat to Jewish life in this country that would be posed by a Corbyn government’. 

Mr Corbyn has previously apologised for hurt caused to Jewish people

Mr Corbyn’s attended at a Passover event hosted by the far-Left group Jewdas, which mocks Israel, in April last year.  

He was also criticised over his presence at a ceremony in Tunisia in 2014 that is said to have honoured the perpetrators of the 1972 Munich terror attack, when 11 members of the Israeli Olympic team were killed.

The party leadership then caused controversy by initially refusing to adopt in full the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance’s definition of anti-Semitism.

One of Mr Corbyn’s closest allies, Emily Thornberry has insisted he does not have anti-Jewish feelings.

She said: ‘When people accused Jeremy of being an anti-Semite he was so upset, and as a result he has found it difficult to deal with the problem.

‘He hasn’t dealt with it properly but to call him anti-Semitic is wrong.’ 

Backlash after ex-Labour MP who hit out at Jewish community has his suspension lifted 

Jim Sheridan (pictured) – who served as MP for Paisley & Renfrewshire and is now a local councillor – apologised while calling his accusers ‘misguided’

Labour is facing a backlash after lifting the suspension of an ex-MP who hit out online about the Jewish community.

An investigation was launched into Mr Sheridan following a complaint that he had posted on social media about his loss of ‘respect and empathy’ for the community over the anti-Semitism row threatening to engulf Labour. 

In a statement, Mr Sheridan – who served as MP for Paisley & Renfrewshire and is now a local councillor – apologised while calling his accusers ‘misguided’.  

But Tories condemned the ‘appalling’ decision to reinstate the politician, warning it sent the ‘wrong message entirely’. 

In his statement, Mr Sheridan said the party had told him on Friday that ‘no further action’ was being taken.

‘Whilst I am delighted with this decision, I remain of the view that my accusers were misguided and overreacted to what was intended to highlight my personal frustration and criticism of those intent on undermining our leadership in Scotland and the UK,’ he said.

‘I would also like to reiterate my sincere apologies to the Jewish community whose historic struggle I have supported all my political life.’

Mr Sheridan said he had been ‘humbled’ by the level of support he received.

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Fury as Corbyn seems to call May a ‘stupid woman’ at PMQs

Did Jeremy Corbyn call May a ‘stupid woman’? MP fury at Labour leader mouthing jibe during bitter Brexit clashes as last PMQs before Christmas descends into ‘pantomime’

  • Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn clashed at the last PMQs before Christmas
  • The PM taunted Mr Corbyn for ‘pantomime’ dithering over no-confidence vote
  • Labour leader appeared to mouth ‘stupid woman’ after the bitter exchanges 

Jeremy Corbyn was accused of calling Theresa May a ‘stupid woman’ during bitter clashes at PMQs today.

The Labour leader appeared to mouth the jibe as the pair faced off over Brexit in a stormy Commons session.

Mrs May had said Mr Corbyn’s position as descending into ‘pantomine’, and said his own party was not behind him.

But as the PM said down to cheers from the Tory benches, Mr Corbyn seemed to mutter: ‘Stupid woman.’

Mrs May had said Mr Corbyn’s position as descending into ‘pantomine’, and said his own party was not behind him

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn appeared to mouth the jibe as the pair faced off over Brexit in a stormy Commons session


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The remark was not picked up on microphones, but politicians from both sides of the House were in little doubt what he said.

Tory MP James Cleverly said: ‘Jeremy Corbyn clearly calling @theresamay a “stupid women” at #PMQs today. This kind of misogynistic language must not be tolerated.’

Labour MP Stella Creasy said: ‘This is not ok. PMQs is a hotbed of emotions but I hope that Jeremy will accept this kind of behaviour isn’t his normal good nature or what we expect of progressive men.’ 

The apparent remark caused uproar in the chamber as MPs became aware of what had happened.

Tory MP Paul Scully asked Mrs May if she had noticed the comment.

Mrs May responded: ‘I think that everybody in this House particularly in the hundreth anniversary of women getting the vote should be encouraging women to come into this chamber… and should therefore use appropriate language.’ 

 

 

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Corbyn gives strongest signal Labour will BACK a second referendum

Corbyn gives strongest signal Labour will BACK a second referendum – saying ‘all options should be on the table’ if May’s deal is voted down

  • Jeremy Corbyn signals his strongest support yet for a second Brexit referendum
  • Labour’s line has been to call for a general election to break the Brexit deadlock   
  • Mrs May’s deal could be voted down by the Commons in their ‘meaningful vote’
  • Mr Corbyn said that should there be no general election, all options should be open, including a second referendum

Mr Corbyn said that should there be no general election, all options should be open – including a second referendum [File photo]

Jeremy Corbyn has given his clearest indication yet that Labour is moving towards backing a second referendum.

Writing for the Guardian, the Labour leader said ‘all options should be on the table’ in the event Theresa May’s Brexit deal is voted down next week.

He said that if the deal was defeated, the Government will have lost its majority in Parliament and its ability to govern.

Labour’s line until now has been to call for a general election to break the deadlock so they could try to negotiate Brexit.

But Mr Corbyn said that should there be no general election, all options should be open – including a second referendum.

‘In the past, a defeat of such seriousness as May now faces would have meant an automatic election. But if under the current rules we cannot get an election, all options must be on the table,’ he said.

‘Those should include Labour’s alternative and, as our conference decided in September, the option of campaigning for a public vote to break the deadlock.’

Theresa May’s deal could be voted down in the Commons on December 11. Corbyn said that if the deal was defeated, the Government will have lost its majority in Parliament and its ability to govern

His words echo those of shadow chancellor John McDonnell who has suggested it is ‘inevitable’ another EU referendum will be called if Labour are not able to force a general election.

An election remains Labour’s preferred option if – as is widely expected – MPs vote down Theresa May’s Brexit deal on 11 December,’ he said.

But he acknowledged that forcing an election would be ‘very difficult’ and, if it was not possible, he said the party would push for another referendum.

Asked by political editor Laura Kuenssberg if a vote of no confidence did not bring down the government and lead to a general election, a second referendum was ‘inevitable’, Mr McDonnell replied: ‘That’s right.’

Labour’s Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell suggested it is ‘inevitable’ another EU referendum will be called if Labour are not able to force a general election [File photo]

Labour has also faced crippling divisions on Brexit as its leadership’s Eurosceptic outlook differs from that of its young, city-dwelling members.

Momentum, the group that propelled Mr Corbyn to power, backs a second referendum and remaining in the EU.

But the Labour union old guard, which provides most of the party’s funding, back Brexit, with many of its members from working class northern towns.

Earlier this week it emerged that Unite boss Len McCluskey has been warning Labour MPs that their voters would see another referendum as a betrayal.


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The general secretary of the country’s biggest union, a close ally of Mr Corbyn, has urged against asking the country again.

‘To suggest it represents a ‘betrayal’ grossly distorts Labour’s position and is deeply unhelpful to those seeking a solution to an issue that is reaching crisis proportions,’ he told the Guardian.

Meanwhile, Tony Blair yesterday predicted again that if Mrs May’s deal is voted down next week, there will be no majority of MPs backing any option.

This, he said, would mean that the decision would have to be put back in the hands of the public in a second referendum.

Tony Blair said Mrs May faced the prospect of ‘hitting a brick wall at speed’ in her vote on December 11. He claimed if the deal is voted down, there will be no majority of MPs backing any option [File photo]

On the ballot paper for a re-run poll should be the choice of remaining in the EU, possibly with concessions on immigration and free movement if these could be obtained from Brussels, and the kind of hard Brexit favoured by those he termed ‘proper Brexiteers’.

Speaking at a Westminster lunch, the former Labour leader said Mrs May faced the prospect of ‘hitting a brick wall at speed’ in the December 11 ‘meaningful vote’.

Rebel Tories’ seats at risk

Dozens of Tory MPs are being warned they could lose their seats if they oppose Theresa May’s Brexit deal, it emerged yesterday.

They are being issued with private polling, commissioned by the party, which suggests Conservatives could lose 7 per cent of their support if they help block the deal.

A Tory research note about the polling, and obtained by the Daily Mail, concludes: ‘Current research shows our vote is holding (up). But the implied impact of this research on seats suggests that MPs voting against the deal could lead to significantly reduced or lost majorities in Conservative seats.’

The research is now being used to put pressure on mutinous MPs threatening to vote down the deal next week.

At the last election 70 Conservative MPs won their seats with majorities of less than 7 per cent. Those on the danger list include prominent MPs who have vowed to vote against the deal such as Zac Goldsmith, Theresa Villiers, Anna Soubry, Justine Greening and Iain Duncan Smith.

The poll, conducted this month, found Tory voters back Mrs May’s deal by 9 per cent.

Asked if she should call the vote off, Mr Blair said: ‘Personally, I don’t see what the point is in going down to a huge defeat.

‘But I think that’s a second-order question. The real issue is, is she prepared to work to see what is a compromise that has parliamentary approval? 

‘My belief is that when that process goes through, she will find that there isn’t one. And if there isn’t one, that’s when my solution becomes more acceptable.’

Although a second referendum with Remain on the ballot paper seemed improbable, it provides the only solution if all Brexit options prove impossible in a deeply-divided Parliament, he said.

Unite boss Len McCluskey has been warning Labour MPs that their voters would see another referendum as a betrayal. The general secretary of the country’s biggest union, a close ally of Mr Corbyn, has urged against asking the country again [File photo]

At the Labour party conference in Liverpool in September, delegates have approved a motion that would keep all options – including a fresh referendum – on the table if MPs are deadlocked over Brexit.

It was passed by a show of hands at the party conference. The vast majority were in favour of the motion, with only a small number against.

Leader Jeremy Corbyn – who has previously ruled out another EU referendum – has said he will respect the result of the vote.

But he has never expressly said it is an option that should be on the table.

However, Labour insisted his quotes did not signal a change in position.

UK may face expat influx

Tens of thousands of expat pensioners could flood back to Britain in the event of a no-deal Brexit, placing huge pressure on the NHS.

The 800,000 Britons who live in the rest of the EU face ‘uncertainty’ if Parliament refuses to accept Theresa May’s deal, a report prepared for ministers reveals.

A quarter of them are pensioners, and if they return to the UK, they would be entitled to free healthcare.

With 60,000 UK nationals on the continent under the age of 15, thousands of school places would also have to be found for returning children.

And an influx of expats could also worsen Britain’s housing crisis.

The warnings are contained in a document published by the Department for Exiting the European Union yesterday.

If UK nationals ‘were unable to continue to live their lives as they do now in a “no deal” scenario and returned to the UK to live’, the Government would have to take a number of steps, it states.

The report said the Government is doing all it could to secure a deal. But if that is not possible ministers would appeal to EU governments to allow Britons to stay. 

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Theresa May vs Jeremy Corbyn live Brexit debate – when is it and how can I watch?

Here is all you need to know about the historic programme.  

Why are Prime Minister Theresa May and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn having the debate?

The PM used an interview in The Sun to lay down the gauntlet to the Labour leader as she battled to win support for her Brexit deal which will see MPs vote on in December 11.

Both party leaders have welcomed the idea of going against one another in Parliament with open arms it seems.

According to Sky News, Jeremy Corbyn said that he would "relish" a head-to-head clash with the PM.

She sparked the challenge when she said that the primetime Sunday night debate would "get the country behind her deal", according to The Daily Telegraph.

If he had declined, she said that she would put herself forward for Q&A style session with a participating audience.

What time is the debate and how can I watch it?

Theresa May has challenged Jeremy Corbyn to a live Brexit TV debate, set for December 9 — the night of the I’m A Celebrity final.

Downing Street has set a provisional date of Sunday, December 9, for the TV debate, just two days before the vote on the deal in the Commons – confirmed as Tuesday, December 11.

It is understood that it will be aired on the BBC although an exact time has not be announced.

 

What is Labour's position?

Labour's official position is that it would vote against any deal struck by Theresa May with the aim of pushing for a General Election.

Shadow Brexit secretary Keir Starmer claimed Britain could still Remain in the EU".

He told Labour's party conference: "We want a General Election to sweep away this failed government."

After the People's Vote rally in central London, Starmer reaffirmed the party have also not ruled out calling for a second Brexit referendum if they couldn't force an election.

Speaking on BBC's Andrew Marr Show, he said: “If there’s no deal brought back or the deal is voted down, then other options are on the table, one of which is a public vote.

“And in that public vote no options are ruled out, including the option of remain."

On November 25 former PM Tony Blair insisted Jeremy Corbyn is likely to start backing a second EU referendum in the near future.

In the summer of 2016, Britain voted to leave the EU after 17.4 million people backed Leave compared to 16.1 million Remain voters.



 

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Corbyn defies calls for a new referendum and calls for a ‘good Brexit’

Corbyn’s speech calling for a ‘radical Brexit’ is met with SILENCE by business leaders as he blasts PM’s ‘botched deal’ and snubs his own party’s call for a second referendum

  • Corbyn made a pro-Brexit speech to the CBI conference in London today 
  • Labour leader said done properly a Brexit deal could revolutionise the economy
  • His speech risks infuriating his party which mostly wants to cancel Brexit 
  • Corbyn has been under growing pressure to back a second EU referendum   

Jeremy Corbyn today called for a ‘radical’ Brexit to transform Britain’s economy – but his words were met with stony silence from the 1,500 business leaders in the room.

The Labour leader also risked infuriating his Remainer MPs by playing down the prospect of another Brexit referendum.

Mr Corbyn – a lifelong socialist who has spent his political career attacking big business – was given a distinctly cool reception as he addressed the CBI conference this morning. 

He lashed Theresa May for ‘botching’ the negotiations and called on her to stand aside and let Labour avoid a ‘no deal’.  

Mr Corbyn – who appeared to don new Michael Caine-style glasses for the speech –  insists Britain needs a new election to install him in Downing Street to build his own Brexit deal.

But he has played down the chance of a second referendum despite the pleas of his party to get behind the idea as a way to stop Brexit.

Jeremy Corbyn (pictured at the CBI conference in London today) insisted tonight that a ‘good Brexit’ deal could transform the economy

Mr Corbyn said that ‘business as usual isn’t working’ and they should back the changes needed to create a fairer society.

‘To meet the greatest challenges facing our country today, we shouldn’t fear change, we should embrace it,’ he told the assembled captains of industry.


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‘Deep-seated change is needed to avoid a damaging Brexit that will hurt enterprise, jobs and living standards, and instead use it as a catalyst for economic transformation.

‘Change is needed to prevent the destruction of our environment that endangers all of our futures.

‘And change is needed to tackle the huge inequality that has distorted the economy and disfigured our society.’

Mr Corbyn – who appeared to don new Michael Caine-style glasses for the speech (pictured) – insists Britain needs a new election to install him in Downing Street to build his own Brexit deal

Mr Corbyn said: ‘A good Brexit plan for this country is not just about what can be negotiated with Brussels, it must also include a radical programme of investment and real change across our regions and nations.

‘In 2016 the country voted to leave the EU against the economic backdrop of post-crash Britain: a million families using food banks, over four million children living in poverty and real wages that are lower today than they were in 2010.

‘Wealth hasn’t trickled down. Instead, rigid and outdated economic thinking has helped create a situation where 20% of Britain’s wealth is in the hands of just 1% of the population.’

He called for workers to be given a stronger say in the running of companies and a higher level of public investment in infrastructure, education, skills and new technologies.

And he said the largest firms ‘will pay a bit more towards the common good’. 

Mr Corbyn has blasted the PM’s divorce package since it was unveiled last week – saying it will make Britain poorer and not guarantee workers rights.

But he admitted that he has not read all of the Brexit divorce bill – which runs to over 500 pages.

And he also said Labour could back another referendum – dubbed a People’s Vote – despite last week saying Brexit cannot be stopped.

It comes just a day after his trusted lieutenant John McDonnell admitted another referendum is now more likely than  a General Election.

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How Corbyn 'attack dog' who calls poppies 'racist' is a grammar school-educated 'ex-Tory who blamed Skripal poisoning on Israel'

Far-left journalist Aaron Bastani, one of Jeremy Corbyn’s biggest supporters, runs Novara Media where he pumps out articles and videos pushing the leftie leader’s message.

His sickening poppy rant is the latest in a string of high profile, attention-seeking incidents in the career of the far-left fanatic.

But like many others in Mr Corbyn's inner circle, including the leader himself, his background wasn't always so controversial.

Bastani was raised in the genteel surroundings of Bournemouth growing up with his mother, a Tory voter, the FT reported,

He even benefited from an education at his local grammar school, where he admits that he had a "great time".

Known then as Aaron Peters, Bastani went on to study for a PhD at Royal Holloway in London, by which time his hard-left views were clear.

After submitting his thesis, titled "Strike! Occupy! Retweet!", he went on to form Novara in 2011 – where it swiftly became a favourite mouthpiece of the hard left.

Over the years, it has published controversial articles – including calling for Labour to reject the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance definition of anti-Semitism, and calling for Facebook to be brought into public ownership.

One recent video asked: "Is the army fascist?"

And like many of his contributors, Bastani is no stranger to extreme views himself.

He has often peddled bizarre conspiracy theories online, including that Israel could have been behind the poisoning of Sergei and Yulia Skripal earlier this year – at a time when the anti-semitism row in Labour was at its high point.

After Labour MP Chris Williamson said the government were using the poisoning to distract from Brexit, Bastani wrote online that the true attackers could have been a “non state actor/private job, Iran, Israel”.





The 34-year-old, a regular guest on the BBC, is one of a group of left-wing journalists believed to have links with Mr Corbyn's office.

The allies are thought to co-ordinate their interventions to help promote Labour's left.

But he wasn’t always a hardcore leftie supporter – and has voiced support Tory Iain Duncan Smith, the Green Party and New Labour politicians in the past.

Embarrassingly for the darling of the hard left, his name was on a UCL Conservative Publication in 2009 praising ex-Tory leader Iain Duncan Smith, along with Blairite Labour MP James Purnell.

But Bastani later said his friend had “edited” his words.

And he was also a member of the Green party at the time of Jeremy Corbyn’s election – joining the party as a supporter to supposedly fight the “Blairites”.

Back in 2015 he backed the Green’s Sian Berry for Mayor of London, tweeting: “Really impressed with Sian Berry and think she would make an outstanding Mayor. Movements need an ally at City Hall!”

He’s previously tweeted his support for David Miliband too.

His hard left activities have also landed Bastani with a criminal record – he was given a suspended sentence and community service for his role in a violent bank attack.

During anti-cuts protests in March 2011, he was filmed ramming a bin into a branch of HSBC, while wearing a bicycle snood.

He was also arrested at another protest against the then-Tory education minister David Willetts at SOAS University.

Photos show him being involved in a brawl that led to his arrest.

And he even once stripped topless at a protest against corporate tax avoidance.


Bastani’s comments yesterday have created a furious backlash, although there has been silence from Jeremy Corbyn, which maybe explains why he has shown no sign of remorse.

Yesterday Tory MP and veteran Johnny Mercer said of his comments: “This is attention seeking bollocks; proud we have a country where clowns like this can sound off; wouldn’t have it any other way.”

And Labour’s ex-defence minister Kevan Jones added: “Making outrageous and uninformed Trump-style claims about the Poppy Appeal may shock and may raise an individual’s media profile – which may have been their only aim – but adds nothing to serious debate of how we support our Armed Forces community or how we recognise the sacrifices that allow the freedom of speech that we have today.


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Jeremy Corbyn voted against tax breaks that will have saved hard-working Brits £6500 by next April

The Labour leader has repeatedly failed to back moves raising the amount employees start to pay tax – which currently stands at £11,850.

The party chief has voted against such measures over the past eight years which have saved basic ratepayers £5,634 since 2011.

Shadow chancellor John McDonnell has also repeatedly refused to back the tax changes implemented by the Tories which started under ex-Chancellor George Osborne.

The party’s most senior figures also voted against the freeze in fuel duty which is likely to save drivers £850 by April next year.

The analysis comes just over a week before Chancellor Philip Hammond delivers his Budget on October 29th.

Tory chairman Brandon Lewis MP said: “It’s clear that Jeremy Corbyn and his top team don’t know how to handle the economy. This Conservative Government has implemented a range of measures to help people with the cost of living, and their opposition to these over the past eight years demonstrates how they can’t be trusted to deliver for ordinary working families.

“While the Conservatives are helping families keep more of what they earn, Jeremy Corbyn is only interested in playing politics with people’s lives.”

A Labour Party spokesman last night said: “It was right that Jeremy Corbyn and John McDonnell voted against George Osborne and Philip Hammond’s Tory austerity budgets.

“The biggest threat to people’s finances comes from wages being lower than in 2010 as a result of the Tories mismanaging our economy.”

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Corbyn-loving capital is the rudest place, writes CHARLOTTE GILL

Corbyn-loving capital likes to think of itself as caring and cosmopolitan but it’s the rudest place on Earth, writes CHARLOTTE GILL

Londoner’s sense of moral superiority was only heightened at the last Election when they largely backed Jeremy Corbyn (pictured) says Charlotte Gill

Ask any Londoner what they think of the capital and they’ll probably tell you, as Mayor Sadiq Khan is fond of boasting, that it’s ‘one of the most progressive cities in the world’.

Londoners like to think of themselves as cultured, caring and cosmopolitan, not least because so many voted Remain in the EU referendum.

This was overwhelmingly portrayed as the open-minded, friendly thing to do. In comparison, Brexiteers around the country were depicted as heartless, grumpy old men and women.

Londoners’ sense of moral superiority was only heightened at the last Election when they largely backed Jeremy Corbyn. What could be less selfish than supporting The Many, Not The Few?

Yet, despite all these compassionate credentials – and the fact that I still enjoy living in the Big Smoke – the truth is that Londoners are actually some of the rudest people on earth.

This is especially apparent when I venture back to my parents’ home in Kent – where, incidentally, most people voted Leave. Every time I walk my little border terrier, Sidney, I am taken aback by the friendliness of strangers.

I do have to confess though, having been conditioned into London life, that every time I’m greeted with a cheery hello, my first instinct is to jump screaming into a bush.

When I was at Leeds University (in Brexit-backing Yorkshire) I adored the bus conductors who called me ‘love’ or ‘darling’ every time I bought a ticket.

The last thing children need is more drugs 

There’s growing hysteria about the mental health of our children, with almost a million prescriptions for antidepressants handed out to youngsters between 2015 and 2018 – and the biggest rise being to those aged 12 and under. Theresa May responded with dramatic guidelines for schools.

Children as young as four will now have to take wellbeing assessments and ‘mental resilience’ classes will be compulsory by 2020. I worry because I’ve seen where all this is heading. 

When I was in my early 20s, I worked with children in America, where the first sign of trouble often results in a trip to the doctor and a dollop of medication. Few of the drugs struck me as effective, and occasionally seemed to worsen symptoms as well as making youngsters dopey and withdrawn.

The number of our children with mental health issues is actually quite small – about one in ten. But if we keep telling our youngsters they’re at risk, it might become a self-fulfilling prophecy.

 

I know as a woman you’re meant to find pet names terribly sexist – but I knew they were just evidence of strangers trying to be nice.

Yet in London, where so many proudly think of themselves as ‘woke’ – the fashionable phrase that means being attuned to every nuance of the latest politically correct behaviour – there is a gaping kindness deficit.

Let me cite two recent examples, both small but each terribly distressing to witness.

The first happened when I was walking around the City. A disabled boy, not much older than six, was trying to reverse his mobility scooter on a busy pavement. 

As he trundled backwards, I noticed a group of young, smartly dressed office workers leaving a cafe. I assumed they would wait for this young lad as he anxiously navigated the road, watched by his assistant in a green bib.

But they were far more interested in rushing their cafe food back to the office, and walked straight into his path.

The bewildered boy had to quickly apply his brakes to avoid a collision, then start his complex manoeuvre all over again.

The workers couldn’t have cared less, laughing and chatting as they sauntered off into the distance.

A few days later, I saw an elderly man with a stick walking slowly and painfully towards my local Sainsbury’s. Strutting the opposite way down the pavement came a young brunette lady, with her earphones in and nose in the air.

T O MY horror, it was the frail gentleman who ended up being the one forced to move aside. On the brunette strolled without even an acknowledgment of his existence.

Such meanness is not remotely unusual in ‘the most progressive city in the world’.

A frail gentleman ended up being the one forced to move aside  when a woman with her earphones in came strutting down the pavement but such meanness is not unusual in ‘the most progressive city in the world’ (stock image)


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Usually it’s the old and vulnerable who are worst affected by others’ lack of courtesy, but even for a young(ish), relatively active woman, such behaviour can be distressing.

Navigating public transport often leaves me feeling like a bowling pin, pushed from side to side. No one ever says thank you – or allows others to go first.

This matters profoundly because it’s social graces that keep society moving. Without them, we’re reduced to the I’m-All-Right-Jack world that London’s Left-wing voters accuse the wicked Right of creating.

It’s all very well proclaiming your love of open borders and wearing your goodness on your T-shirt.

But it’s hard to take such sentiments seriously when that compassion isn’t even extended to the streets.  

Daisy Goodwin, the screenwriter behind TV’s Victoria has said TV shows like Killing Eve (pictured) could lure us into a ‘false sense of equality’

Daisy Goodwin, the screenwriter behind TV’s Victoria, has warned that the numbers of empowered women on-screen – think Bodyguard, Killing Eve and Doctor Who for a start – could lure us all into a ‘false sense of equality’. Something tells me the sisterhood will never be happy! 

Yawn of the week

Taylor Swift coming out as a Democrat. Writing on Instagram, she declared: ‘In the past I’ve been reluctant to publicly voice my political opinions, but due to several events in my life and in the world in the past two years, I feel very differently about that now.’ Wouldn’t it be thrilling to find just one celebrity who wasn’t a sanctimonious bore?   

When PC means just Plain Crazy

Last week I wrote that British universities were turning into politically correct cults. Of course, it’s worse in America where a trio of academics have just carried out a highly revealing piece of research.

Concerned about the spiralling numbers of pseudo-scientific papers on gender, race and sexuality – what they call ‘grievance studies’ – they submitted 20 fake pieces of research to respected academic journals.

One examined dog rape culture. Another explored Mein Kampf as a feminist text. A third asked whether white male students should be forced to sit on the floor in chains. Seven nonsense papers were accepted, and seven were in the submission process before the project was exposed.

It’s impossible to know whether to laugh or cry.

The Government has defended its new suicide prevention Minister, Jackie Doyle-Price, after she said – in 2014 – she would ‘sooner jump off Beachy Head’ than join Ukip. This was deemed ‘unacceptable’ by Labour. As celebrities and political figures are finding, their enemies have become skilled at hunting for offensive tweets, however ancient. Some call these snoopers ‘offence archaeologists’. ‘Saddos’ seems more fitting. 

For her final collection as poet laureate, Carol Ann Duffy has written about the ‘evil twins of Brexit and Trump’. Not exactly season of mists and mellow fruitfulness, is it? 

Facebook claims that ‘only’ 30 million people had their names, phone numbers and emails stolen in its data breach. That’s all right then…

Jeremy Corbyn says children should be taught about the ‘role and legacy’ of the British Empire and colonisation. Will they also be taught about the tens of millions killed by the Marxism he’s devoted his life to?

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Corbyn to meet EU negotiator Barnier in Brussels

Corbyn to meet EU negotiator Barnier after demanding Theresa May stand aside if she cannot get her Brexit deal through Parliament

  • Labour’s leader will hold new talks with EU negotiator Michel Barnier tomorrow 
  • Corbyn used his conference speech to demand May quits if she can’t get a deal 
  • Labour leader is travelling to Brussels for the talks following his party conference
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Jeremy Corbyn will meet EU negotiator Michel Barnier in Brussels tomorrow after demanding Theresa May stand aside if she cannot get her deal through Parliament.

Labour’s leader used his main conference speech in Liverpool to demand a General Election if the Prime Minister cannot deliver a deal.

Mrs May’s proposals are rejected by the Brexiteer wing of her own party, Mr Corbyn’s Labour and Brussels – making them look impossible to pass.


Jeremy Corbyn  (pictured today speaking to Labour conference in Liverpool) will meet EU negotiator Michel Barnier in Brussels tomorrow after demanding Theresa May stand aside if she cannot get her deal through Parliament


Mr Corbyn will have a new round of talks with the EU’s chief negotiator Michel Barnier (pictured earlier this month in Slovenia) in Brussels tomorrow 

Labour’s conference has been dominated by Brexit splits amid a row over whether the party should endorse a second referendum.

Party policy has stumbled toward backing a new poll if Mrs May refuses a general election – prompting further splits over whether remaining in the EU should be on the ballot.

Shadow Brexit Secretary Sir Keir Starmer has seen off critics in the party this week who insisted any new referendum should only be between an exit deal and no deal – making a remain option likely.

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But Mr Corbyn told activists: ‘Keir, having got agreement yesterday in this conference hall, getting one in Brussels should be a piece of cake.’ 

What are Labour’s six tests for Brexit?  

Labour has insisted it will only vote for a Brexit deal that meets its six tests – and Emily Thonberry claimed today the Chequers plan cannot do so.

The tests are: 

1. Does it ensure a strong and collaborative future relationship with the EU?

2. Does it deliver the ‘exact same benefits’ as we currently have as members of the Single Market and Customs Union?

3. Does it ensure the fair management of migration in the interests of the economy and communities?

4. Does it defend rights and protections and prevent a race to the bottom?

5. Does it protect national security and our capacity to tackle cross-border crime?

6. Does it deliver for all regions and nations of the UK?

Mr Corbyn repeated his threat to vote down Theresa May’s planned deal if it does not include a customs union and a solution on the Irish border.

And he said there must be a snap election if the PM cannot get her deal past MPs. 

The Labour leader said: ‘Let me say to the country. As it stands, Labour will vote against the Chequers plan or whatever is left of it and oppose leaving the EU with no deal.

‘And it is inconceivable that we should crash out of Europe with no deal – that would be a national disaster.

‘That is why if Parliament votes down a Tory deal or the government fails to reach any deal at all we would press for a General Election.

‘Failing that, all options are on the table.’

Labour’s four-day conference in Liverpool has been dominated by Brexit, but has seen the Labour leader and shadow chancellor John McDonnell set out a range of policies to reverse inequalities in wealth and economic power.

These have ranged from workers in the boardroom to employee shareholding funds and new taxes on second homes.

They sparked warnings from the CBI that Labour risks ‘cracking the foundations of this country’s prosperity’.


Shadow Brexit Secretary Sir Keir Starmer (second left in Liverpool today) has seen off critics in the party this week who insisted any new referendum should only be between an exit deal and no deal – making a remain option likely

The shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer yesterday said Labour’s analysis of the Chequers deal showed it would fail all six of the party’s ‘Brexit tests’.

And he said Labour would never back a so-called ‘blind Brexit’, in which the final terms of Britain’s future relationship with the EU are fudged until after it has left.

With Mrs May ruling out alternative plans, Labour now looks set to oppose any deal this autumn – even though that could leave the UK facing a no-deal Brexit, which the party says it opposes. 

How has Labour’s position on Brexit shifted since the election?


Critics say Jeremy Corbyn is even more determined than the government to have his cake and eat it on Brexit

Labour’s Brexit stance has undergone so many changes it can be difficult to keep track.

Even during the referendum in 2016 Jeremy Corbyn was accused of half-hearted campaigning and hedging his bets – admitting he was only ‘7 out of 10’ in favour of Remain.  

SInce then the leadership has been trying to maintain ‘constructive ambiguity’ so it can keep hold of heartland voters who often back Brexit – without alienating the party’s largely Remainer members and MPs.

But critics say Mr Corbyn is even more determined than the government to have his cake and eat it, and has no real answers to what shape Brexit should take.

The latest version of Labour’s Brexit policy is due to be voted on at the 2018 conference. Official policy says there should be a new general election but if this is impossible, the party could back a new referendum. 

SECOND REFERENDUM

Last September Mr Watson said the party was ‘not ruling it out, but it’s highly unlikely’.

But in November, letters emerged from shadow home secretary Diane Abbott to constituents saying she would ‘argue for the right of the electorate to vote on any deal that is finally agreed’.

In December, Mr Corbyn said ‘We’ve not made any decision on a second referendum.’

But by January this year he was stating: ‘We are not supporting or calling for a second referendum. What we’ve called for is a meaningful vote in Parliament.’

Numerous backbenchers have said they want to see a second referendum on a Brexit deal. 

By conference 2018 internal debate over a second referendum prompted more than 150 different motions on the issue. A ‘composited’ version invites members to back a new general election but leave a ‘People’s Vote’ on the table.

Senior Labour figures have split on what any second referendum should mean – with some, such as Len McCluskey and John McDonnell insisting remaining in the EU cannot be on the ballot – but Sir Keir Starmer has said the motion means it could be. 


In December last year, Sir Keir Starmer said he would like a ‘Norway-style treaty’ and as a result ‘there may have to be payments to be negotiated’

SINGLE MARKET

After the election in June last year, Mr Corbyn sacked three frontbenchers for voting in favour of a Commons motion calling for the UK to stay in the single market.

The same month shadow chancellor John McDonnell said: ‘I think people will interpret membership of the single market as not respecting that referendum.’

However, the following September Labour’s deputy leader Tom Watson said single market membership was possible ‘if the European Union wanted to talk about reform of freedom of movement rules’.

Sir Keir Starmer has said the party wants ‘a partnership that retains the benefits of the single market and the customs union’.

Labour whipped its peers to abstain from a vote in favour of the single market earlier this month, but the instructions were largely ignored and many backed the idea. 

Mr Corbyn briefed MPs on his single market stance at a behind closed doors meeting on May 14. But they did not seem entirely clear on his position, with one backbencher emerging to say he had left the prospect open, but another saying he had made clear the option was ‘dead’.

A massive rebellion is expected in a Commons vote that could happen next month.

CUSTOMS UNION

Shadow trade secretary Barry Gardiner said in July 2017 that staying in the EU customs union would be a ‘disaster’ as it would entail an ‘asymmetrical relationship’ and damage Britain’s ability to make deals with other countries.

But in February this year Sir Keir confirmed that the party wants to stay in a customs union with the bloc – although not the current one because that would mean EU membership. He said ‘the only way realistically’ for the UK to get tariff-free access to the EU.

The following month Emily Thornberry said Labour wanted to maintain the existing customs union.


Last month Barry Gardiner was caught on mic giving a withering assessment of Labour’s six tests for approving a Brexit deal, saying they were ‘b*****cks’

‘What we want to do is we want to remain in the customs union,’ she said. ‘We don’t want any faffing around with any of the nonsense that the Government is coming up with in relation to alternatives to the customs union. We want to remain in the customs union.’ 

Last month Mr Gardiner was caught on mic giving a withering assessment of Labour’s six tests for approving a Brexit deal, saying they were ‘b*****cks’.

‘We know very well that we cannot have the exact same benefits,’ he said.

Mr Gardiner has also suggested that fears over the Irish border are being whipped up for ‘political’ reasons. 

PAYING FOR ACCESS TO MARKETS

In December last year, Sir Keir said he would like a ‘Norway-style treaty’ and as a result ‘there may have to be payments to be negotiated’.

However, in January this year, John McDonnell said ‘I don’t understand why we would have to pay’ for access to the single market.

 

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Corbyn vows to ‘eradicate’ anti-Semitism

Jeremy Corbyn vows to ‘eradicate’ anti-Semitism from Labour’s ranks as he pleads with Jews to ‘draw a line’ under the toxic storm – but he STILL hasn’t apologised

  • Corbyn addressed the anti-Semitism storm engulfing his party in major speech 
  • Speaking to delegates in Liverpool he said he hoped to ‘draw a line’ under row 
  • Jewish groups demanded an apology from Corbyn for his and Labour’s actions
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Jeremy Corbyn today vowed to ‘eradicate’ anti-Semitism from Labour’s ranks and the wider country in a new plea to the Jewish community.

The Labour leader stopped short of making a full apology to the Jewish community as has been demanded but said he hoped to ‘draw a line’ under the toxic row.

He insisted in his Liverpool speech fighting racism was ‘part of who I am’.


Jeremy Corbyn (pictured at Labour conference today’ vowed to ‘eradicate’ anti-Semitism from Labour’s ranks and the wider country in a new plea to the Jewish community.


The Labour leader stopped short of making a full apology to the Jewish community as has been demanded but said he hoped to ‘draw a line’ under the toxic row

Recalling a visit to the Terezin concentration camp, Mr Corbyn said: ‘The row over anti-Semitism has caused immense hurt and anxiety in the Jewish community and great dismay in the Labour Party.

‘But I hope we can work together to draw a line under it.’

He added: ‘We will work with Jewish communities to eradicate antisemitism, both from our party and wider society.

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‘And with your help I will fight for that with every breath I possess.

‘Anti-racism is integral to our very being. It’s part of who you all are, and it’s part of who I am.’

Mr Corbyn lashed Theresa May’s Tories for refusing to act against the hard-right government in Hungary.

He said: ‘We won’t accept it when we’re attacked by Tory hypocrites who accuse us of anti-Semitism one day, then endorse Viktor Orban’s hard right government the next.

‘Or when they say we are racist, while they work to create a hostile environment for all migrant communities.’


Jewish Labour MP Luciana Berger has been accompanied by uniformed police throughout the party conference after enduring a storm of abuse of anti-Semitism 

Mr Corbyn repeated his promise to recognise a Palestinian state and told delegates it must be part of a two state solution alongside a ‘secure Israel’.

Deputy leader Tom Watson last night warned there was a ‘moral obligation’ to act on anti-Semitism in the party at the Labour Friends of Israel’s conference gathering.


Labour has a ‘moral obligation’ to tackle anti-Semitism in its ranks, Tom Watson (pictured last night at the Labour Friends of Israel meeting) has warned leader Jeremy Corbyn 

Speaking to loud applause at a meeting of the Labour Friends of Israel, Mr Watson hailed the work of MPs Joan Ryan, Ian Austin and Luciana Berger, all of whom have been the targets of abuse and criticism for their efforts to expose anti-Semitism.

The meeting was also attended by shadow foreign secretary Emily Thornberry, who earlier told the conference that anti-Semites must be kicked out of the party. Leader Jeremy Corbyn was not present.

Mr Watson said that LFI chair Ms Ryan, who lost a no confidence vote in her Enfield North constituency, had been ‘hounded by people who have only just joined the Labour Party’.

And he told the meeting: ‘We have a moral obligation to rid this party of anti-Semitism.

‘I recognise the hurt that has been caused, I recognise the pain that has been thrust upon our friends in the Jewish community. I know how failing to tackle the problem risks bringing eternal shame.

‘I just hope we can do what we can to rebuild that trust and confidence.’

Timeline of anti-Semitic scandals which have erupted under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership


Jeremy Corbyn (pictured) has been accused of failing to tackle the racism among his supporters 

The anti-Semitism scandal has dogged Labour since Jeremy Corbyn was elected leader  in 2015.

Here is a timeline of the controversies: 

April 2016:

Labour MP Naz Shah is suspended for anti-Semitic posts – including one in which she appeared to endorse calls for Israelis to be deported to the US. 

She apologised and was given a formal warning.  

Ken Livingstone goes on the radio to defend Ms Shah – but sparks fresh controversy by claiming that Hitler supported Zionism. 

He is suspended by Labour but refuses to apologise and has repeated the claim many times.

He eventually quits Labour two years later, saying his suspension has become a distraction.

June 2016: 

A two-month inquiry by civil liberties campaigner Shami Chakrabarti finds that Labour is not overrun by anti-Semitism. 

But the launch is overshadowed when Jewish Labour MP Ruth Smeeth flees it in tears after being accused by Corbyn supporter Marc Wadsworth of colluding with the press.

Critics accuse the report of being a whitewash and Ms Chakrabarti is widely criticised for accepting a peerage from Jeremy Corbyn shortly afterwards.

October 2016: 

The Home Affairs Select Committee says Labour is guilty of incompetence over its handling of anti-Semitism and of creating a safe space for people with ‘vile attitudes towards Jewish people’.

March 2018: 

It is revealed that Jeremy Corbyn defended an artist who painted an anti-Semitic mural and said the offensive art should be removed.

He apologises saying he did not properly look at the picture before he made the post.

Jewish leaders take the unprecedented step of holding a demonstration outside Parliament protesting Mr Corbyn’s failure to tackle anti-Semitism.

Several Labour MPs address the crowds.

April 2018:

Marc Wadsworth is expelled from Labour after being accused of anti-Semitism. 

Meanwhile, Labour Jewish MPs tell of the anti-Semitic abuse they have suffered in a powerful parliamentary debate – and round on their leader for failing to tackle it. 

July 2018:

The Labour leadership sparks fresh anger by failing to fully adopt the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance’s definition of anti-Semitism

Peter Willsman, a strong ally of Jeremy Corbyn, is secretly taped ranting that Jewish ‘Trump fanatics’ invented the anti-Semitism storm engulfing Labour. 

In an angry diatribe at a meeting of Labour’s ruling executive committee, he said he was ‘amazed’ there was evidence party members hated Jews.

He claimed ‘some of these people in the Jewish community support Trump – they are Trump fanatics’ before shouting: ‘So I am not going to be lectured to by Trump fanatics making up duff information without any evidence at all.’

August 2018:

Jeremy Corbyn issues a video insisting he is committed to tackling the racism – but it is panned by Jewish leaders.

Corbynistas mount a social media campaign to get deputy Labour leader Tom Watson to quit after he criticises the party’s handling of anti-Semitism. 

The Daily Mail exclusively publishes photos of Jeremy Corbyn holding a wreath at a ceremony where a terrorist linked to the Munich massacre was honoured.

The Labour leader insists he was there to honour others killed – but faces fresh calls to quit over the scandal. 

 

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Jeremy Corbyn REFUSES to apologise over Labours alleged anti-Semitism

Corbyn REFUSES to say sorry as he is confronted with examples of alleged anti-Semitism in bruising interview kicking off Labour conference

  • Jeremy Corbyn endured bruising interview as he kicked off Labour conference
  • The Labour leader was challenged over examples of anti-Semitism in the party
  • Asked to apologise to Jewish community Mr Corbyn just said he was ‘anti-racist’
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Jeremy Corbyn refused to say sorry today as he was confronted with a litany of examples of alleged anti-Semitism.

The Labour leader floundered as he tried to bat off criticism of his own conduct – and a wider wave of vile abuse that has been wracking the party.

In the bruising interview as Labour conference kicked off in Liverpool, the BBC’s Andrew Marr challenged Mr Corbyn on how he had failed to ‘notice’ that a mural he defended was an anti-Semitic trope. 

He was also braced on his jibe about some ‘British Zionists’ not understanding ‘English irony’, and his attendance at a ceremony in Tunisia honouring terrorists linked to the Munich massacre.

But pressed to apologise to the Jewish community, Mr Corbyn merely insisted that he was ‘anti-racist’ and said Labour was ‘welcoming’ to all communities.


In a bruising interview as Labour conference kicked off in Liverpool, the BBC’s Andrew Marr challenged Mr Corbyn (pictured) over anti-Semitism in the party


Mr Corbyn was also pressed on his intervention in a decision to remove a mural (pictured) depicting a group of ‘hook-nosed’ men around a Monopoly board, from a wall in east London

Mr Corbyn said he had been ‘hurt’ that veteran Labour MP Margaret Hodge and former chief Rabbi Lord Sacks had branded him personally an anti-Semite.

Invited by Marr to look down the lens of the camera and personally apologise to the Jewish community for the anti-Semitism crisis, Mr Corbyn replied: ‘I’ll simply say this – I am an anti-racist and will die an anti-racist. 

‘Anti-Semitism is a scourge in any society and I will oppose it all my life and I will continue to oppose it all my life.’

He insisted that under his leadership rules against anti-Semitism have been toughened up.

He added: ‘The party must be and is a safe and welcoming place for all communities.’ 

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Mr Corbyn was confronted by a video uncovered by MailOnline when he said some British Zionists had ‘no sense of English irony’.

He defended himself, saying that he was simply defending the Palestinian ambassador Manuel Hassassian against ‘very, very abusive’ protesters at the meeting.

He said: ‘I was upset on his behalf…about the way he had been treated. I felt I should say something in his support.’

Asked if he accepted that it was anti-Semitic, Mr Corbyn said: ‘Well, it was not intended to be anti-Semitic in any way, and I have no intention – and am opposed in every way to anti-Semitism because I can see where it leads to.

‘I can see where it leads to now, in Poland, in Hungary, in central Europe, I can see where it led to in the past.

‘We have to oppose racism in every form, and I do.’ 

Mr Corbyn was also pressed on his intervention in a decision to remove a mural, which depicts a group of ‘hook-nosed’ men around a Monopoly board, from a wall in east London.

When the artist complained on Facebook that it was being painted over, Mr Corbyn replied: ‘Why?’, before going on to condemn previous destruction of controversial political art.

Jewish groups condemned the image, saying it contained ‘vile anti-Semitic tropes’ such as the idea that Jewish people controlled the world. 


Mr Corbyn smiled for the cameras as he arrived for the first day of the Labour conference in Liverpool today


Mr Corbyn said he had been ‘hurt’ that veteran Labour MP Margaret Hodge and former chief Rabbi Lord Sacks had branded him personally an anti-Semite

Mr Corbyn said today: ‘I was worried about the idea of murals being taken down and my thoughts were about that…the mural was taken down and I was perhaps too hasty in my judgement on that. It has been taken down and I am glad it has.’

Marr responded: ‘I would have thought it would take about one second to look at that and say that that is an anti-Semitic trope there.’

But as he pointed out that the mural was packed full of standard anti-Semitic symbols, the Labour leader said: ‘It also has other symbols in it as well doesn’t it? Like the Freemasons.’

He added: ‘I was concerned about the idea of takin down public murals, I am pleased to say it was taken down.’

Asked directly if he now thinks it is anti-Semitic, Mr Corbyn said: ‘I think it should not have been put up.’ 

In one particularly uncomfortable exchange, Marr said: ‘Jeremy Corbyn, are you an anti-Semite?’

Mr Corbyn replied: ‘No. Absolutely not. I have spent my whole life opposing racism in any form and I will die fighting racism in any form.’

But Marr said: ‘It is extraordinary I even had to ask that question.’ 

Timeline of anti-Semitic scandals which have erupted under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership


Jeremy Corbyn (pictured) has been accused of failing to tackle the racism among his supporters 

The anti-Semitism scandal has dogged Labour since Jeremy Corbyn was elected leader  in 2015.

Here is a timeline of the controversies: 

April 2016:

Labour MP Naz Shah is suspended for anti-Semitic posts – including one in which she appeared to endorse calls for Israelis to be deported to the US. 

She apologised and was given a formal warning.  

Ken Livingstone goes on the radio to defend Ms Shah – but sparks fresh controversy by claiming that Hitler supported Zionism. 

He is suspended by Labour but refuses to apologise and has repeated the claim many times.

He eventually quits Labour two years later, saying his suspension has become a distraction.

June 2016: 

A two-month inquiry by civil liberties campaigner Shami Chakrabarti finds that Labour is not overrun by anti-Semitism. 

But the launch is overshadowed when Jewish Labour MP Ruth Smeeth flees it in tears after being accused by Corbyn supporter Marc Wadsworth of colluding with the press.

Critics accuse the report of being a whitewash and Ms Chakrabarti is widely criticised for accepting a peerage from Jeremy Corbyn shortly afterwards.

October 2016: 

The Home Affairs Select Committee says Labour is guilty of incompetence over its handling of anti-Semitism and of creating a safe space for people with ‘vile attitudes towards Jewish people’.

March 2018: 

It is revealed that Jeremy Corbyn defended an artist who painted an anti-Semitic mural and said the offensive art should be removed.

He apologises saying he did not properly look at the picture before he made the post.

Jewish leaders take the unprecedented step of holding a demonstration outside Parliament protesting Mr Corbyn’s failure to tackle anti-Semitism.

Several Labour MPs address the crowds.

April 2018:

Marc Wadsworth is expelled from Labour after being accused of anti-Semitism. 

Meanwhile, Labour Jewish MPs tell of the anti-Semitic abuse they have suffered in a powerful parliamentary debate – and round on their leader for failing to tackle it. 

July 2018:

The Labour leadership sparks fresh anger by failing to fully adopt the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance’s definition of anti-Semitism

Peter Willsman, a strong ally of Jeremy Corbyn, is secretly taped ranting that Jewish ‘Trump fanatics’ invented the anti-Semitism storm engulfing Labour. 

In an angry diatribe at a meeting of Labour’s ruling executive committee, he said he was ‘amazed’ there was evidence party members hated Jews.

He claimed ‘some of these people in the Jewish community support Trump – they are Trump fanatics’ before shouting: ‘So I am not going to be lectured to by Trump fanatics making up duff information without any evidence at all.’

August 2018:

Jeremy Corbyn issues a video insisting he is committed to tackling the racism – but it is panned by Jewish leaders.

Corbynistas mount a social media campaign to get deputy Labour leader Tom Watson to quit after he criticises the party’s handling of anti-Semitism. 

The Daily Mail exclusively publishes photos of Jeremy Corbyn holding a wreath at a ceremony where a terrorist linked to the Munich massacre was honoured.

The Labour leader insists he was there to honour others killed – but faces fresh calls to quit over the scandal. 

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Corbyn aide ‘banned from Ukraine’ has ties to Stalinist activists

Corbyn aide ‘banned from Ukraine over Putin links’ is revealed to have shared a stage with ‘Stalinist’ activists who ‘spread Kremlin propaganda’

  • Ex-communist Andrew Murray shared platform with members of Borotba group
  • Mr Murray was barred from entering Ukraine on grounds of ‘national security’
  • In response, the adviser claimed his name was being blackened by ‘deep state’ British spies working to prevent a Corbyn government 

Security fears: Mr Murray has been banned from Ukraine because he’s a ‘national security risk’

The row over the alleged links between a key Jeremy Corbyn aide and the Kremlin deepened last night as new evidence emerged of his associations with Stalinist activists accused of spreading propaganda for Vladimir Putin.

Former communist Andrew Murray has shared a platform with key members of the Borotba group who have been accused of being ‘agents of influence’ for Moscow.

Last weekend, The Mail on Sunday revealed that Mr Murray had been barred from entering Ukraine on the grounds of ‘national security’.

In response, the adviser claimed his name was being blackened by ‘deep state’ British spies working to prevent a Corbyn government.

His theory provoked derision from Labour deputy leader Tom Watson, who described his account as ‘a bit John Le Carré’, and called on him to provide evidence ‘otherwise it’s just fake news’.

Officers with the Ukrainian state security service, the SBU, said they had banned Mr Murray for three years because they believe him to be part of President Putin’s ‘global propaganda network’ – something he denies.


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This newspaper has now obtained evidence that Mr Murray – who has failed to receive security clearance for a Commons pass despite working for Mr Corbyn for a year – campaigned with activists identified in a cache of leaked emails as Putin propagandists. The so-called ‘Kremlin leaks’ listed a network of activists around the world and their importance to Moscow, including members of Borotba, a Stalinist group which supported Russian-backed separatism in Ukraine.

When Mr Murray addressed a meeting of the Solidarity With The Antifascist Resistance In Ukraine (SARU) group at the Marx Memorial Library in London in November 2014, Borotba’s leader Alexey Albu spoke to the group on a video link. Mr Albu is described in the leaked papers as ‘high-profile’ ‘non-state effective personnel’.

At a meeting in London in November 2014, Mr Murray was on stage and Borotba’s leader Alexey Albu (pictured) spoke to the audience via a video link

And when Mr Murray spoke at another SARU meeting in June 2015, he was joined on video link by another Borotba leader, Viktor Shapinov, who is listed in the emails as ‘personnel of medium efficiency’. A third member of Borotba, Sergei Kirichuk, who also spoke at the same 2014 SARU meeting as Mr Murray, via Skype, was listed as ‘state personnel’ in the files. A spokesman for Mr Murray, who was chairman of the Stop The War campaign group before Mr Corbyn took on the role, said: ‘Andrew has never heard of these people and has no connection with Borotba.’

The leaked emails from Kremlin aide Vladislav Surkov – who has been dubbed Putin’s Rasputin – were revealed by a network of Ukrainian hackers in 2016. The Kremlin has dismissed material as ‘fabricated’, despite a number of individuals named in the messages confirming they were genuine.

According to the leaks, Surkov instructed his network to downplay suggestions of Russian involvement in the shooting down of Malaysia Airlines’ MH17 plane over Ukraine in 2014, which investigators concluded had been hit by a Russian missile, killing all 298 people on board. At the SARU event in 2014, Mr Murray did just that.

There is no suggestion that Mr Murray was aware of the Surkov instruction, and he says he has been a frequent critic of Putin.

 

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PETER OBORNE: Jeremy Corbyn needs to change track soon

PETER OBORNE: If Jeremy Corbyn doesn’t change track soon he may hit the Brexit buffers

Angry. Defiant. Yet rational. Speaking in front of two large Union flags in her Downing Street bunker yesterday, this was a Theresa May we’ve never seen before.

Indeed, there were shades of Margaret Thatcher when, years ago, she defied her own Brussels nemesis Jacques Delors by telling him: ‘No! No! No!’

And what a contrast with the desperate and almost tearful Mrs May on public view in Salzburg less than 24 hours earlier.

Mrs May is guaranteed a much easier reception from the Tory faithful at the party’s conference in Birmingham in 11 days’ time

A performance of this power during last year’s General Election campaign might have seen her win by a landslide. The Prime Minister is now rallying much of her mutinous Conservative Party behind her — even some of the most die-hard Brexiteers.

One thing is certain. Mrs May is guaranteed a much easier reception from the Tory faithful at the party’s conference in Birmingham in 11 days’ time.

After yesterday’s ultimatum to the other 27 EU leaders that they must treat the UK with ‘respect’ in Brexit negotiations, she can no longer be accused of being spineless.

Jeremy Corbyn drives a new London Overground train – but if he doesn’t change track he may hit the Brexit buffers

I was reminded of King Lear when he said: ‘I will do such things. What they are yet I know not, but they shall be the terrors of the earth. You think I’ll weep? No, I’ll not weep.’

Yes, all alone in Salzburg, she must have seen France’s Emmanuel Macron, EU chief Donald Tusk and Angela Merkel as her own ‘terrors of the earth’.

Whatever people say about our Prime Minister, she has nobly striven to obtain a meaningful settlement with Brussels ever since she took up her post more than 26 months ago.

Now nearing the endgame, she has staked all her authority and every last ounce of her political credibility on her Chequers proposals. Her determination to press on has been driven by her insistence that British companies should not suffer any disturbance post-Brexit in their trade with Europe.


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For her, the alternative would risk constitutional, political and economic havoc. And personally, such a result would surely mean she would have to step down. Of course, this is the nightmare scenario. But I want to consider a more likely outcome — that a compromise deal will be found.

That deal would have to be approved by a vote by MPs. Crucially, the arithmetic of the House of Commons will dictate whether any Brexit deal is accepted.

Currently, there are 315 Conservative MPs, 257 Labour, 35 Scottish Nationalists, 12 Lib Dems and ten Ulster Unionists.

Even assuming that the vast majority of Tories back Mrs May — and that is a big ‘if’ — there is no guarantee that she would win a Commons Brexit vote.

For the sake of argument, consider if Mrs May lost. Jeremy Corbyn would be asked to form a Labour government. But I am convinced that, even with Scottish Nationalist support, he would not be able to hold such a government together. That would plunge Britain into a third General Election in three years.

Jeremy Corbyn speaking during Prime Minster’s Questions in the House of Commons, London

In view of what would be seen as an unwanted poll, caused by warring and incompetent Tories’ inability to secure Brexit, Corbyn would be favourite to win.

Hence next week’s Labour conference in Liverpool could be a gathering of Britain’s government-in-waiting.

In that case, it would be one of the most important Labour conferences for years — comparable with those dramatic events in the Eighties when Neil Kinnock took on and defeated the militant hard Left.

Significantly, Corbyn is coming under huge pressure to commit Labour to join calls for a second referendum on Brexit.

He’s being told by advisers that this is the only way that he can bring together the disparate elements of his party, comprising Momentum (his hard-Left base of intensely loyal activists) on one side and Blairites on the other.

However, backing a second referendum would mean going against his long-held principles.

At heart, he is anti-EU — having voted in the 1975 referendum for Britain to pull out of the Common Market, alongside his hero Tony Benn who saw it as an anti-democratic ‘capitalist club’.

Corbyn believes that he cannot achieve his dream of creating a socialist Britain while we belong to the EU.

Sir Keir Starmer (pictured), had no comment to make on his normally busy Twitter account about Mrs May’s Salzburg bruising

Happily, therefore, he has consistently stated that it is Labour policy to respect the 2016 referendum result. This means a Labour government under him would honour the Brexit vote.

That said, over the coming days, he will face a formidable coalition of forces which are determined to persuade him to make a U-turn and publicly entertain the idea of Britain remaining in the EU.

Momentum, for example, says it won’t stand in the way of a debate on a second Brexit referendum after local groups pushed for members to be given a say.

The Labour Party as a whole is at sixes and sevens over Brexit.

This was evident yesterday when the party’s Brexit spokesman, Sir Keir Starmer, had no comment to make on his normally busy Twitter account about Mrs May’s Salzburg bruising.

Still, I can’t see how Corbyn can avoid coming up with a clearer Brexit policy next week.

His trade union paymasters are placing intense pressure on him to review his stance. In a fascinating development, delegates at the Trades Union Congress voted to keep open the possibility of a second referendum.

This chimes with Sir Keir’s own views — having said he wants another referendum to be ‘on the table’ if Parliament votes down Mrs May’s deal.

And, of course, former party leader Tony Blair and his supporters last week launched a campaign for another vote on Europe.

So here we have a powerful range of people across the spectrum of views in the Labour Party who disagree with their leader on Brexit. In addition, Corbyn is being told that a change of stance on Brexit could enable him to reunite a Labour Party damaged by toxic allegations of anti-Semitism.

One final factor should not be underestimated.

Pollsters report that Labour voters have become keener on Remain since the referendum. This is significant, because it allays Corbynista fears that by changing tack on Europe, hundreds of thousands of its supporters in Northern constituencies that voted Leave might be alienated.

Until now, with a few twists and turns, Jeremy Corbyn has been a co-driver on the Brexit Express.

Indeed, he’s stood in the tradition of Hugh Gaitskell, the Labour leader who more than half a century ago said that joining the Common Market would mark the end of 1,000 years of English history.

If he wants to have any chance of becoming prime minister, the perpetually anti-Brussels Jeremy Corbyn must urgently spell out with crystal clarity how he wants Britain to deal with those European ‘terrors of the earth’.

Hunt shames dismal Boris – but must go further    

Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt put his predecessor, Boris Johnson, to shame this week, when, on his visit to Myanmar (formerly Burma), he made it a priority to meet political prisoners who have suffered at the hands of the repressive government led by Nobel Peace Prize-winner Aung San Suu Kyi. Johnson had dismally failed to challenge her and raise the issue of the genocide of minority Rohingya Muslims.

Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt (pictured) walks towards the Foreign Office in London

However, Hunt should have gone further and repeated the demand of a recent United Nations report that Myanmar’s murderous generals should be sent for trial at the International Criminal Court.

And it would have helped the cause of human rights worldwide if Hunt had used the word ‘genocide’.

With just 124,000 members, the Tories are now only Britain’s third largest party — behind Labour (540,000 members) and trailing the Scottish Nationalists (125,500). Embarrassingly, they have only 25,000 more members than the clueless Lib Dems.

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Jeremy Corbyn last night opened the door to a second Scottish independence referendum if Labour win power

Speaking on the eve of Labour party conference he said he is “not ruling out” granting a second vote if he becomes PM.

He said he would “decide at the time” what to do if Nicola Sturgeon asked for his consent.

But he insisted that another vote on independence is not a good idea.

Mr Corbyn made the comments in an interview with BBC Scotland ahead of his party’s conference, which gets under way in Liverpool this weekend.

Scottish Conservatives have described the remarks as a “gaffe”, while the Liberal Democrats branded Mr Corbyn’s stance “extraordinary”.

The SNP said it would be a “democratic outrage” for any prime minister to block giving Scots a choice over their future.

The independence referendum in September 2014 was held after the Scottish and UK governments signed the Edinburgh Agreement, allowing the vote to take place and committing both sides to respect the result.

Asked what he would do if First Minister Nicola Sturgeon were to seek the power to hold a second vote on independence, Mr Corbyn told the broadcaster: “We would obviously decide at the time.”

He said a Labour government would invest in Scotland through a £20 billion transformation fund and a £3 billion increase in revenue spending and predicted that a Labour government in Westminster would be an “ally” to Scotland.

Pressed on whether he was ruling out giving the Scottish Government consent for the holding of a referendum, he told the BBC: “I’m not ruling out – I’m just pointing out the reality of it.

“We don’t want another referendum, we don’t think another referendum is a good idea, and we’ll be very clear on why we don’t think it’s a good idea.

“We think what’s more important is dealing with child poverty, housing problems and lack of investment in Scotland – 200,000 more children going into poverty has to be dealt with.

A referendum will not solve that.”

Responding to Mr Corbyn’s latest comments, Scottish Conservative constitution spokesman Adam Tomkins said: “Every time Jeremy Corbyn talks about Scotland he gives yet another concession to the SNP.

“It’s more proof that Labour are utterly weak when it comes to Scotland’s place in the UK.

“Jeremy Corbyn does not care about Scotland, and has no interest in standing up to the nationalists, as this latest gaffe proves.”

Scottish Liberal Democrat leader Willie Rennie described Mr Corbyn’s position as “extraordinary”, as he reiterated his party’s opposition to another “divisive” referendum.

“So many people with moderate and progressive views will be horrified by this careless attitude towards the UK,” he said.

“The case against independence is even stronger since the SNP’s Growth Commission admitted what we said about independence in 2014 was right.”

The SNP was elected on a manifesto that said the Scottish Parliament should have the right to hold another referendum if there is a significant and material change in the circumstances that existed in 2014. SNP depute leader Keith Brown said: “We already have the democratic mandate to give the people of Scotland a choice over their future – a position backed by the Scottish Parliament. For any prime minister to stand in the way of that would be a democratic outrage.

“Of course, it used to be the case that Labour thought the people of Scotland were sovereign and should determine their own future. Now, apparently, it’s down to the whim of the MP for Islington North.”

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Jeremy Corbyn adviser claims MI5 is trying to stop him taking power

Ex-communist Jeremy Corbyn adviser claims MI5 is trying to stop Labour taking power after he was banned from the Ukraine over ‘links to Putin’

  • Andrew Murray said he had detected the workings of the ‘deep state’
  • As evidence he pointed out he had been denied House of Commons security clearance for over a year
  • His suspicions were raised when it was revealed he had been barred from the Ukraine

An advisor to Jeremy Corbyn has suggested MI5 is conspiring to stop the Labour leader winning power.

Andrew Murray, a former communist, said he had detected the workings of the ‘deep state’. As evidence, he pointed out he had been denied House of Commons security clearance for over a year.

He said his suspicions were raised when the Mail on Sunday revealed at the weekend that he had been barred from Ukraine for allegedly being part of Vladimir Putin’s ‘global propaganda network’.

Andrew Murray has suggested MI5 is conspiring to stop the Labour leader winning power

Mr Murray was in the Communist Party of Britain before joining Labour in 2016. He works for Unite general secretary Len McCluskey and for Mr Corbyn part time.

In the New Statesman magazine he wrote: ‘The denial to me of Commons security clearance and a raft of hostile stories suggests the intelligence services may be working to block the election of a Labour government.’


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Mr Murray suggested that journalists were helped by government officials to reveal the Ukraine ban: ‘Someone else is doing the hard work – possibly someone being paid by the taxpayer.

‘I doubt if their job description is preventing the election of a Corbyn government, but who knows? We are often told the days of secret state political chicanery are long past and we must hope so.

‘But sometimes you have to wonder – this curiously timed episode seems less rooted in a Kiev security scare than in a political stunt closer to home.’

Mr Murray denied he was a Russian sympathiser, or part of Vladimir Putin’s global propaganda network.

He said: ‘I am no admirer of the Putin regime. Those charmed by its authoritarian conservative nationalism are found on the alarmingly well-populated authoritarian conservative nationalist wing of contemporary politics.’

 

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Corbyn refuses to protect MPs targeted for deselection by hard-left

Labour split deepens as Corbyn refuses to protect MPs targeted for deselection by hard-left

Labour split deepens as Corbyn refuses to protect MPs targeted for deselection by hard-left allies and his deputy Tom Watson SNUBS speech at party conference

  • Jeremy Corbyn has told MPs that he will not protect them from deselection bids
  • Hard-left activists have been making bids to oust a series of moderate MPs  
  • Labour leader said he found the accusations he is anti-Semitic ‘very hurtful’ 
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Labour’s divisions were deepening today after Jeremy Corbyn refused to protect moderate MPs targeted for deselection by his hard-left allies.

The Labour leader caused fresh anger by insisting he would not intervene to stop politicians being ousted from their constituencies by activists.

The row erupted after it emerged Rosie Duffield was the latest MP facing a revolt by local members in Canterbury over her support for pro-Israel groups.

The censure motion was finally withdrawn last night – but no confidence votes have been passed against Joan Ryan, chairman of Labour Friends of Israel, Gavin Shuker and Chris Leslie.

Meanwhile, it is understood that deputy Labour leader Tom Watson has snubbed delivering a speech from the podium at what promises to be a turbulent party conference.


The Labour leader (pictured last week on a trip to Leicester) was roundly condemned after MailOnline exclusively published a video in which he accused British Zionists of having ‘no sense of English irony’




Deputy leader Tom Watson (pictured left), who has had a long-running feud with Mr Corbyn and his allies, is said to have decided not to speak at Labour conference after being offered lower-grade slots. Gavin Shuker (pictured right) is among the MPs targeted for deselection

Mr Watson, who has had a long-running feud with Mr Corbyn and his allies, is said to have decided not to speak at Labour conference after being offered lower-grade slots. 

At a stormy meeting of the Parliamentary Labour Party last night, Mr Corbyn was berated over his handling of the anti-Semitism crisis and the backlash against centrists MPs.  

But the veteran left-winger told the meeting: ‘I know what it feels like to be the target of a no confidence vote but it would be wrong for me to intervene in the democratic rights of any part of the Labour Party.’

He also enraged MPs by saying they should stop criticising him and focus their attacks on the Tory Government.

He said: ‘We will always have some differences of opinion and we must protect the right of criticism and debate but our first and overwhelming priority is to deliver for the people we represent and remove this Conservative government from office.

‘We must focus on that priority and turn our fire outwards.’

Speaking after the showdown, Labour MP Siobhan McDonagh denounced the leader, saying: ‘Rosie Duffield has been an MP for 18 months. She is a young woman who is facing a disciplinary meeting.

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‘It is incumbent on all of us who have been round a lot longer to make sure that that meeting is conducted in a proper and respectful way to both the members and to Rosie, and the idea that the leader of our party has no responsibility for that is completely wrong. 

Mr Corbyn last night complained about his ‘pain’ at being branded a racist over the anti-Semitism scandal.

The Labour leader was roundly condemned after MailOnline exclusively published a video in which he accused British Zionists of having ‘no sense of English irony’.

Ex chief rabbi Lord Sacks accused Mr Corbyn of being an ‘anti-Semite’ and compared the remarks to Enoch Powell’s notorious ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech.

Speaking to Holyrood magazine, the Labour leader told how he was left feeling upset after coming in for the criticism.

He said: ‘I have found these accusations very painful because my whole life has been about opposing racism and I saw at first-hand in Jamaica the hurt inflicted by Powell’s words.’

Mr Corbyn added: ‘I was in Jamaica when Enoch Powell made his ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech.

‘When the speech came through, there were a lot of people in Jamaica, quite rightly, very, very angry.

‘I was teaching in a school where we had facilities to listen to the speech and we read about it, and the reaction was enormous.’


Joan Ryan, a leading critic of Jeremy Corbyn’s failure to tackle the anti-Semitism crisis, (pictured after a local party meeting in north Londonlast week) lost the confidence motion by just two votes at a party meeting in Enfield, north London

Mr Corbyn recalled that some of children he had been teaching that day ‘wanted to make sure I got home alright because a lot of people were very angry, and they didn’t want me blamed’.

The Labour leader added: ‘They were right to be angry about Powell. Fighting racism, it’s been my life and now I represent, and have done for a very long time, a very multicultural mixed society and I’m very proud to represent it.’

Mr Corbyn has faced ferocious criticism from many of his own MPs and Jewish leaders for failing to get a grip on the anti-Semitism crisis.

And many of the Labour moderates who have dared to speak out to criticise  him over the racism row have been hit by moves to deselect them by the hard-left. 

The Labour leader was accused of being an anti-Semite after a video emerged of him in 2013 questioning the identity of British Zionists  who had criticised Palestinian ambassador Manuel Hassassian.

Mr Corbyn said: ‘They clearly have two problems.

‘One is they don’t want to study history, and secondly, having lived in this country for a very long time, probably all of their lives, they don’t understand English irony either.’

The comments sparked a massive backlash.

Lord Sacks said: ‘The recently disclosed remarks by Jeremy Corbyn are the most offensive statement made by a senior British politician since Enoch Powell’s 1968 ‘Rivers of Blood’ speech.

‘It was divisive, hateful and like Powell’s speech it undermines the existence of an entire group of British citizens by depicting them as essentially alien.’ 

What is the timeline of anti-Semitic scandals which have erupted under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership?


Jeremy Corbyn (pictured) has been accused of failing to tackle the racism among his supporters 

The anti-Semitism scandal has dogged Labour since Jeremy Corbyn was elected leader  in 2015.

Here is a timeline of the controversies: 

April 2016:

Labour MP Naz Shah is suspended for anti-Semitic posts – including one in which she appeared to endorse calls for Israelis to be deported to the US. 

She apologised and was given a formal warning.  

Ken Livingstone goes on the radio to defend Ms Shah – but sparks fresh controversy by claiming that Hitler supported Zionism. 

He is suspended by Labour but refuses to apologise and has repeated the claim many times.

He eventually quits Labour two years later, saying his suspension has become a distraction.

June 2016: 

A two-month inquiry by civil liberties campaigner Shami Chakrabarti finds that Labour is not overrun by anti-Semitism. 

But the launch is overshadowed when Jewish Labour MP Ruth Smeeth flees it in tears after being accused by Corbyn supporter Marc Wadsworth of colluding with the press.

Critics accuse the report of being a whitewash and Ms Chakrabarti is widely criticised for accepting a peerage from Jeremy Corbyn shortly afterwards.

October 2016: 

The Home Affairs Select Committee says Labour is guilty of incompetence over its handling of anti-Semitism and of creating a safe space for people with ‘vile attitudes towards Jewish people’.

March 2018: 

It is revealed that Jeremy Corbyn defended an artist who painted an anti-Semitic mural and said the offensive art should be removed.

He apologises saying he did not properly look at the picture before he made the post.

Jewish leaders take the unprecedented step of holding a demonstration outside Parliament protesting Mr Corbyn’s failure to tackle anti-Semitism.

Several Labour MPs address the crowds.

April 2018:

Marc Wadsworth is expelled from Labour after being accused of anti-Semitism. 

Meanwhile, Labour Jewish MPs tell of the anti-Semitic abuse they have suffered in a powerful parliamentary debate – and round on their leader for failing to tackle it. 

July 2018:

The Labour leadership sparks fresh anger by failing to fully adopt the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance’s definition of anti-Semitism

Peter Willsman, a strong ally of Jeremy Corbyn, is secretly taped ranting that Jewish ‘Trump fanatics’ invented the anti-Semitism storm engulfing Labour. 

In an angry diatribe at a meeting of Labour’s ruling executive committee, he said he was ‘amazed’ there was evidence party members hated Jews.

He claimed ‘some of these people in the Jewish community support Trump – they are Trump fanatics’ before shouting: ‘So I am not going to be lectured to by Trump fanatics making up duff information without any evidence at all.’

August 2018:

Jeremy Corbyn issues a video insisting he is committed to tackling the racism – but it is panned by Jewish leaders.

Corbynistas mount a social media campaign to get deputy Labour leader Tom Watson to quit after he criticises the party’s handling of anti-Semitism. 

The Daily Mail exclusively publishes photos of Jeremy Corbyn holding a wreath at a ceremony where a terrorist linked to the Munich massacre was honoured.

The Labour leader insists he was there to honour others killed – but faces fresh calls to quit over the scandal. 

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Diane Abbott says Corbyn is Labour’s most anti racist leader ever

Diane Abbott says Corbyn is Labour’s most anti racist leader ever

‘You couldn’t make it up!’ Diane Abbott sparks fury after she describes Corbyn as the most anti racist Labour leader ever despite the anti-Semitism crisis

  • Diane Abbott hailed Jeremy Corbyn as an anti-racist on Jewish New Year
  • Frontbencher was accused of ignoring the anti-Semitism scandal rocking Labour
  • Mr Corbyn facing fresh criticism for holding Labour meeting on Jewish New Year 
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Diane Abbott sparked fury today after she dubbed Jeremy Corbyn Labour’s most anti-racist leader ever – despite accusations that he is anti-Semitic. 

The shadow home secretary accused Labour MPs who have warned that Labour has become an ‘institutionally racist’ party of waging a vendetta against Mr Corbyn.

But her tweet, which was sent today as the Jewish community celebrate their new  year – known as Rosh Hashanah – was condemned by Labour MPs and Jewish leaders.

It comes just three weeks after the MailOnline exclusively published a video showing Mr Corbyn accusing British Zionists of having ‘no sense of English irony’.

The clip, from 2013, sparked a political storm and caused ex chief rabbi Lord Sacks to brand the Labour leader an ‘anti-Semite’ who ‘defiles our politics’.  

But Ms Abbott made no mention of the anti-Semitism crisis which has gripped the Labour Party under Mr Corbyn’s watch as she praised her leader.




Diane Abbott (pictured left on Friday on the red carpet in London) sparked fury today after she dubbed Jeremy Corbyn (pictured right last week on a visit to a water pump museum in Leicester) Labour’s most anti-racist leader ever – despite accusations that he is anti-Semitic

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She wrote:  ‘Labour now has the most anti-racist leader in its history. But exactly at this point it is suggested Labour is institutionally racist? 

‘This isn’t fighting racism. It’s fighting Jeremy Corbyn.’

Meanwhile, Mr Corbyn is facing fresh criticism for holding Labour’s meeting of its parliamentary party tonight – when the Jewish community is celebrating their new year.

A Labour MP told MailOnline that at least two Jewish MPs were not able to attend the PLP meeting tonight.

They said: ‘They are not coming into parliament because it is Jewish New Year. It really sums up Corbyn’s attitude.’ 

Ms Abbott’s comments are a swipe at Labour MP Chuka Umunna and former chairman of the Equality and Human Rights Commission Trevor Phillips who both accused Labour of being institutionally racist.


Labour’s shadow home secretary Diane Abbott chose Jewish New Year to heap praise on Jeremy Corbyn for being an anti-racist – ignoring the anti-Semitism row


Tal Ofer, from the Board of Deputies for British Jews, hit out at Ms Abbott over the remarks 


Former Labour MP Tom Blenkinsop also tore into Ms Abbott for the comment – voicing his disbelief that she could make the grandiose claim

Tal Ofer, from the Board of Deputies of British Jews, said: ‘Dismissing the concerns of British Jews and on Rosh Hashanah. 

‘You can’t make it up, this is Labour Party in 2018 #EnoughIsEnough #LabourAntisemitism.’ 

Labour MP John Mann, chairman of the all party group on anti-Semitism, told MailOnline: ‘I wasn’t aware that she had met and knew all the Labour leaders. 

‘She must be much older than I thought. No other Labour leader has ever been accused of being a racist though, so I am not sure that history will make such a bold claim.’

Speaking yesterday, former frontbencher Mr Umunna said it was ‘very painful’ to admit Labour had such deep-seated problems.

But he vowed to stay as a Labour member because he it was better to ‘try and argue and see change through in an organisation’ rather than ‘leave the field’.

While former chairman of the Equality and Human Rights Commission Trevor Phillips claimed the Labour Party is ‘led by anti-Semites and racists’.

Mr Umunna told Sky News’ Sophy Ridge On Sunday programme: ‘If you look at the definition of institutional racism as outlined by Sir William Macpherson in the Macpherson Report and the Macpherson Inquiry produced the institutional racism definition.

‘The Labour Party, it’s beyond doubt for me that it has met it – it’s very painful for me to say that.’ 

Streatham MP Mr Umunna has been facing demands to apologise for saying the leadership should ‘call off the dogs’ to stop moderate MPs being driven out by abuse from the hard-left.

Mr Phillips, who served as a Labour member of the London Assembly for three years, told the Mail on Sunday that rows about anti-Semitism are ‘killing our party’.

Labour has faced accusations of anti-Semitism as senior figures have demanded the leadership take firm action to prove the party is not hostile to the Jewish community.

Mr Phillips said: ‘It doesn’t help that one of our great parties, the one I belong to, is led by anti-Semites and racists who basically want to eliminate anyone who disagrees with them.’    

What is the timeline of anti-Semitic scandals which have erupted under Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership?


Jeremy Corbyn (pictured) has been accused of failing to tackle the racism among his supporters 

The anti-Semitism scandal has dogged Labour since Jeremy Corbyn was elected leader  in 2015.

Here is a timeline of the controversies: 

April 2016:

Labour MP Naz Shah is suspended for anti-Semitic posts – including one in which she appeared to endorse calls for Israelis to be deported to the US. 

She apologised and was given a formal warning.  

Ken Livingstone goes on the radio to defend Ms Shah – but sparks fresh controversy by claiming that Hitler supported Zionism. 

He is suspended by Labour but refuses to apologise and has repeated the claim many times.

He eventually quits Labour two years later, saying his suspension has become a distraction.

June 2016: 

A two-month inquiry by civil liberties campaigner Shami Chakrabarti finds that Labour is not overrun by anti-Semitism. 

But the launch is overshadowed when Jewish Labour MP Ruth Smeeth flees it in tears after being accused by Corbyn supporter Marc Wadsworth of colluding with the press.

Critics accuse the report of being a whitewash and Ms Chakrabarti is widely criticised for accepting a peerage from Jeremy Corbyn shortly afterwards.

October 2016: 

The Home Affairs Select Committee says Labour is guilty of incompetence over its handling of anti-Semitism and of creating a safe space for people with ‘vile attitudes towards Jewish people’.

March 2018: 

It is revealed that Jeremy Corbyn defended an artist who painted an anti-Semitic mural and said the offensive art should be removed.

He apologises saying he did not properly look at the picture before he made the post.

Jewish leaders take the unprecedented step of holding a demonstration outside Parliament protesting Mr Corbyn’s failure to tackle anti-Semitism.

Several Labour MPs address the crowds.

April 2018:

Marc Wadsworth is expelled from Labour after being accused of anti-Semitism. 

Meanwhile, Labour Jewish MPs tell of the anti-Semitic abuse they have suffered in a powerful parliamentary debate – and round on their leader for failing to tackle it. 

July 2018:

The Labour leadership sparks fresh anger by failing to fully adopt the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance’s definition of anti-Semitism

Peter Willsman, a strong ally of Jeremy Corbyn, is secretly taped ranting that Jewish ‘Trump fanatics’ invented the anti-Semitism storm engulfing Labour. 

In an angry diatribe at a meeting of Labour’s ruling executive committee, he said he was ‘amazed’ there was evidence party members hated Jews.

He claimed ‘some of these people in the Jewish community support Trump – they are Trump fanatics’ before shouting: ‘So I am not going to be lectured to by Trump fanatics making up duff information without any evidence at all.’

August 2018:

Jeremy Corbyn issues a video insisting he is committed to tackling the racism – but it is panned by Jewish leaders.

Corbynistas mount a social media campaign to get deputy Labour leader Tom Watson to quit after he criticises the party’s handling of anti-Semitism. 

The Daily Mail exclusively publishes photos of Jeremy Corbyn holding a wreath at a ceremony where a terrorist linked to the Munich massacre was honoured.

The Labour leader insists he was there to honour others killed – but faces fresh calls to quit over the scandal. 

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Labour voting vicar has 'adopted' serial killer Rose West and even buys knickers for her to wear in prison

Jeremy Corbyn-backing Mike Dixon, 75, and wife Mary, 79, let her call them Mum and Dad. The prison visitors buy clothes for Rose, 64, by mail order.


Her last delivery included red and black lace underwear which she proudly showed off to other lags.

A source at the Durham jail said ex-councillor Mike is known as “Mick the Vic”.

They added: “Rose has grown extremely close and relies on them for stuff like advice, companionship and help with shopping.”

Rose’s daughter Mae has revealed: “She’d say, ‘They’re my mum and dad now’.

And that annoyed me — I couldn’t shrug off my parents.”

The Rev Dixon has worked as a prison chaplain.

In 2015 the Labour Party member featured in a Guardian newspaper piece on “Corbyn chic” — conference guests who dressed like the leader.

West was convicted of ten murders in 1995, and is serving a whole life tariff.

Husband Fred hanged himself in jail on New Year’s Day 1995 while awaiting trial for 12 murders.

Several victims were buried at their home in Gloucester.

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Jeremy Corbyn faces standards probe for not declaring Tunisia visit

Jeremy Corbyn faces standards probe for failing to declare controversial Tunisia visit

Corbyn faces standards probe over wreath-laying visit: Labour leader is ‘cooperating’ with watchdog after not declaring trip to Palestinian graves linked to Munich Olympic terrorists

  • Mr Corbyn is understood to have been contacted by parliamentary watchdog 
  • Party sources told MailOnline that the Labour leader would be ‘cooperating’
  • The trip to attend a conference in 2014 was funded by the Tunisian government 

Jeremy Corbyn is facing a standards probe over failing to declare a trip to Tunisia where a wreath was laid for terrorist masterminds. 

The Labour leader is understood to have been contacted by the parliamentary watchdog after a complaint was made. 

Party sources told MailOnline he would be ‘cooperating’. 

The trip to attend a conference on the Israel-Palestine conflict in 2014 was funded by the Tunisian government. 

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Jeremy Corbyn is facing a standards probe over failing to declare a trip to Tunisia where a wreath was laid for terrorist masterminds

Mr Corbyn faced a storm over the summer when it emerged that during the three-day visit he attended a ceremony where a wreath was laid at the graves of Palestinians linked to the Munich Olympics terrorist attack. 

Eyebrows were also raised that the trip was not declared on the Commons register.


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Mr Corbyn insists this was because the costs were below the threshold for declaration, which was £660 at the time. 

However, images of the opulent hotel where he stayed sparked doubts about the claim, and complaints were made to the parliamentary standards commissioner, Kathryn Stone.  

Mr Corbyn faced a storm when it emerged he attended a ceremony where a wreath was laid at the graves of Palestinians linked to the Munich Olympics terrorist attack (pictured above)

Previously Ms Stone would have revealed publicly whether she was investigating Mr Corbyn. 

But MPs controversially voted before the summer recess to keep probes secret unless politicians are found guilty of misconduct.

Mr Corbyn stayed at the five-star Le Palace hotel in Gammarth, Tunisia, where the conference in 2014 was held.

The five-star Le Palace hotel in Gammarth, Tunisia, where the conference in 2014 was held

According to the website for Le Palace – which overlooks the Mediterranean and boasts a pool, bars and restaurants – suites are charged at up to £1,000 a night.

The cheapest rooms are currently around £170 a night, and he is thought to have checked in for two nights.

Flights and transport costs are also believed to have been picked up by the Tunisian government.

 

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