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World News

Jeremy Corbyn risks climate change activist fury after easing target

<h2>Jeremy Corbyn risks climate change activist fury after watering down a target to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2030 as he unveils his general election manifesto</h2>
<ul><li><strong>Labour conference voted in September to hit net zero carbon emissions by 2030</strong></li><li><strong>But manifesto commits to making 'substantial majority' of reductions by 2030</strong></li></ul>
<p>Jeremy Corbyn today risked activist fury after watering down a commitment to tackling climate change in the Labour Party's 2019 general election manifesto.</p>
<p>The party's annual conference in September backed plans to commit Labour to working 'towards a path to net zero carbon emissions by 2030'. </p>
<p>But Mr Corbyn's new blueprint for the country only commits to 'achieve the substantial majority of our emissions reductions by 2030'. </p>
<p>The less exacting target is unlikely to go down well with climate change campaigners but will be welcomed by some union chiefs. </p>
<img class="aligncenter" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/21/14/21294566-7711051-image-a-24_1574346776548.jpg" height="421" width="634">
<p>Jeremy Corbyn, pictured launching his general election manifesto in Birmingham today, has committed Labour to achieving the 'substantial majority' of carbon emissions reductions by 2030</p>
<p>The latter had urged the Labour leadership to water down the pledge amid fears that the original one would have forced major job losses, particularly in the energy industry. </p>
<p>The manifesto, unveiled by Mr Corbyn at an event in Birmingham this morning, states: 'Labour will kick-start a Green Industrial Revolution that will create one million jobs in the UK to transform our industry, energy, transport, agriculture and our buildings, while restoring nature.</p>
<p>'Our Green New Deal aims to achieve the substantial majority of our emissions reductions by 2030 in a way that is evidence-based, just and that delivers an economy that serves the interests of the many, not the few.'</p>
<p>Despite changing the target, the party's manifesto does have a strong focus on the environment as Mr Corbyn tries to see off an electoral threat from the Green Party. </p>
<p>The manifesto also contains ambitions to put the UK on track for a 'net zero' energy system within the 2030s and for British food production to reach net zero carbon by 2040 – which is in line with the farming sector's plans.</p>
<p>Labour's overall pledge on carbon emissions is more ambitious than the Liberal Democrats' commitment for a new legally binding target to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2045, or the Tories' existing 2050 target which became law in the summer.</p>
<p>Labour says it's plans will be funded through a 'green transformation fund' worth £250 billion. </p>
<p>That cash will be used to produce the shift to a green economy, funding renewable energy sources and low-carbon energy. </p>
<p>The money would also be spent on making transport more sustainable and to repair damage done to wildlife and the environment.   </p>
<p>The manifesto also contains a proposal to impose a windfall tax on oil companies to help to cover the costs of climate damage. </p>
<p>Labour is also proposing an immediate and permanent ban on fracking. </p>
<p>Meanwhile, it confirms previous pledges to upgrade almost all of the UK's 27 million homes to the highest energy-efficiency standards and to build thousands of new offshore and onshore wind turbines.   </p>
Source: <a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7711051/Jeremy-Corbyn-risks-climate-change-activist-fury-watering-key-target.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Read Full Article</a>

Categories
World News

Jeremy Corbyn risks climate change activist fury after easing target

<h2>Jeremy Corbyn risks climate change activist fury after watering down a target to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2030 as he unveils his general election manifesto</h2>
<ul><li><strong>Labour conference voted in September to hit net zero carbon emissions by 2030</strong></li><li><strong>But manifesto commits to making 'substantial majority' of reductions by 2030</strong></li></ul>
<p>Jeremy Corbyn today risked activist fury after watering down a commitment to tackling climate change in the Labour Party's 2019 general election manifesto.</p>
<p>The party's annual conference in September backed plans to commit Labour to working 'towards a path to net zero carbon emissions by 2030'. </p>
<p>But Mr Corbyn's new blueprint for the country only commits to 'achieve the substantial majority of our emissions reductions by 2030'. </p>
<p>The less exacting target is unlikely to go down well with climate change campaigners but will be welcomed by some union chiefs. </p>
<img class="aligncenter" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/21/14/21294566-7711051-image-a-24_1574346776548.jpg" height="421" width="634">
<p>Jeremy Corbyn, pictured launching his general election manifesto in Birmingham today, has committed Labour to achieving the 'substantial majority' of carbon emissions reductions by 2030</p>
<p>The latter had urged the Labour leadership to water down the pledge amid fears that the original one would have forced major job losses, particularly in the energy industry. </p>
<p>The manifesto, unveiled by Mr Corbyn at an event in Birmingham this morning, states: 'Labour will kick-start a Green Industrial Revolution that will create one million jobs in the UK to transform our industry, energy, transport, agriculture and our buildings, while restoring nature.</p>
<p>'Our Green New Deal aims to achieve the substantial majority of our emissions reductions by 2030 in a way that is evidence-based, just and that delivers an economy that serves the interests of the many, not the few.'</p>
<p>Despite changing the target, the party's manifesto does have a strong focus on the environment as Mr Corbyn tries to see off an electoral threat from the Green Party. </p>
<p>The manifesto also contains ambitions to put the UK on track for a 'net zero' energy system within the 2030s and for British food production to reach net zero carbon by 2040 – which is in line with the farming sector's plans.</p>
<p>Labour's overall pledge on carbon emissions is more ambitious than the Liberal Democrats' commitment for a new legally binding target to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2045, or the Tories' existing 2050 target which became law in the summer.</p>
<p>Labour says it's plans will be funded through a 'green transformation fund' worth £250 billion. </p>
<p>That cash will be used to produce the shift to a green economy, funding renewable energy sources and low-carbon energy. </p>
<p>The money would also be spent on making transport more sustainable and to repair damage done to wildlife and the environment.   </p>
<p>The manifesto also contains a proposal to impose a windfall tax on oil companies to help to cover the costs of climate damage. </p>
<p>Labour is also proposing an immediate and permanent ban on fracking. </p>
<p>Meanwhile, it confirms previous pledges to upgrade almost all of the UK's 27 million homes to the highest energy-efficiency standards and to build thousands of new offshore and onshore wind turbines.   </p>
Source: <a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7711051/Jeremy-Corbyn-risks-climate-change-activist-fury-watering-key-target.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Read Full Article</a>

Categories
World News

Jeremy Corbyn risks climate change activist fury after easing target

<h2>Jeremy Corbyn risks climate change activist fury after watering down a target to achieve net zero carbon emissions by 2030 as he unveils his general election manifesto</h2>
<ul><li><strong>Labour conference voted in September to hit net zero carbon emissions by 2030</strong></li><li><strong>But manifesto commits to making 'substantial majority' of reductions by 2030</strong></li></ul>
<p>Jeremy Corbyn today risked activist fury after watering down a commitment to tackling climate change in the Labour Party's 2019 general election manifesto.</p>
<p>The party's annual conference in September backed plans to commit Labour to working 'towards a path to net zero carbon emissions by 2030'. </p>
<p>But Mr Corbyn's new blueprint for the country only commits to 'achieve the substantial majority of our emissions reductions by 2030'. </p>
<p>The less exacting target is unlikely to go down well with climate change campaigners but will be welcomed by some union chiefs. </p>
<img class="aligncenter" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/1s/2019/11/21/14/21294566-7711051-image-a-24_1574346776548.jpg" height="421" width="634">
<p>Jeremy Corbyn, pictured launching his general election manifesto in Birmingham today, has committed Labour to achieving the 'substantial majority' of carbon emissions reductions by 2030</p>
<p>The latter had urged the Labour leadership to water down the pledge amid fears that the original one would have forced major job losses, particularly in the energy industry. </p>
<p>The manifesto, unveiled by Mr Corbyn at an event in Birmingham this morning, states: 'Labour will kick-start a Green Industrial Revolution that will create one million jobs in the UK to transform our industry, energy, transport, agriculture and our buildings, while restoring nature.</p>
<p>'Our Green New Deal aims to achieve the substantial majority of our emissions reductions by 2030 in a way that is evidence-based, just and that delivers an economy that serves the interests of the many, not the few.'</p>
<p>Despite changing the target, the party's manifesto does have a strong focus on the environment as Mr Corbyn tries to see off an electoral threat from the Green Party. </p>
<p>The manifesto also contains ambitions to put the UK on track for a 'net zero' energy system within the 2030s and for British food production to reach net zero carbon by 2040 – which is in line with the farming sector's plans.</p>
<p>Labour's overall pledge on carbon emissions is more ambitious than the Liberal Democrats' commitment for a new legally binding target to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2045, or the Tories' existing 2050 target which became law in the summer.</p>
<p>Labour says it's plans will be funded through a 'green transformation fund' worth £250 billion. </p>
<p>That cash will be used to produce the shift to a green economy, funding renewable energy sources and low-carbon energy. </p>
<p>The money would also be spent on making transport more sustainable and to repair damage done to wildlife and the environment.   </p>
<p>The manifesto also contains a proposal to impose a windfall tax on oil companies to help to cover the costs of climate damage. </p>
<p>Labour is also proposing an immediate and permanent ban on fracking. </p>
<p>Meanwhile, it confirms previous pledges to upgrade almost all of the UK's 27 million homes to the highest energy-efficiency standards and to build thousands of new offshore and onshore wind turbines.   </p>
Source: <a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7711051/Jeremy-Corbyn-risks-climate-change-activist-fury-watering-key-target.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Read Full Article</a>

Categories
Travel

Westerner risks his life to tour ex-ISIS stronghold of Mosul in Iraq

‘My holiday in HELL’: Westerner risks his life to tour the annihilated former ISIS stronghold of Mosul in Iraq – and pays £4,000 for the privilege

  • Andy Drury, 53, from Guildford in Surrey, spent three days on a mini-break to the northern Iraqi city of Mosul
  • He brought back never-before-seen photographs of the city, which was at the centre of the ISIS caliphate
  • Father-of-four spoke to innocent survivors and their families about how they are trying to rebuild their lives

A married British father claims he has become the first person to take a holiday in the ruins of the so-called Islamic State – and he paid £4,000 for the privilege.

Without visas and in constant danger of kidnapping, beatings from militia, and even death, Andy Drury took a three-day mini-break to Mosul, which was once hell on earth.

Father-of-four Andy, 53, has brought back never-before-seen photographs of the devastated city in northern Iraq, which was once the centre of the ISIS caliphate.

Married father-of-four Andy Drury claims he has become the first person to take a holiday in the ruins of the so-called Islamic State in Mosul, northern Iraq. Pictured are the ruins of a huge hospital complex in Mosul that was destroyed in the fighting 

Andy, a building firm owner, from Guildford, Surrey, has spent the past 20 years touring areas of the planet most us don’t dare tread. Pictured are some of the houses that were blown to pieces during the battle with ISIS 

Andy stands next to a building which had been daubed with an Arabic declaration claiming it belongs to ISIS 

Amid shocking apocalyptic scenes, innocent survivors and their families spoke to him about trying to rebuild their lives in the rubble.

Andy, a building firm owner, from Guildford, Surrey, has spent the past 20 years touring areas of the planet most us don’t dare tread – and it’s not the first time he’s been to Iraq.

In 2016, he narrowly escaped death after visiting the frontline in Bashiir, south of Kirkuk, where he spent time with Kurdish soldiers fighting ISIS.

During that encounter, Andy, who doesn’t wear a bulletproof vest or helmet, was shot at by ISIS but luckily escaped unharmed.

Andy, who lives with his wife and children, said his biggest reason for returning to the dangerous region last month was to see if the men he spent time with on the front line were still alive.

His three-day tour was split into visiting the former frontline near Kirkuk as well as the ex-ISIS stronghold of Mosul.

Andy said: ‘I must be the first tourist in the ruins of Islamic State.

‘My fixer Ammar (not his real name) would take reporters to the frontline during the taking back of Mosul.

‘But he said he was more scared with me because with the news reporters, he was in an armoured car.

‘But I didn’t wear a vest or helmet. He said that was scarier.’

During the first day of his trip last month, Andy said travelling to where he had visited the soldiers in 2016 proved much more difficult this time.

Andy’s three-day tour was split into visiting the former frontline near Kirkuk as well as the ex-ISIS stronghold of Mosul. Pictured is a mosque in Mosul, where Andy’s guide said he saw a father burying his son and daughter 

As he travelled around Mosul, Andy says that he saw many signs warning people of unexploded bombs and ammunition

He explained: ‘It was really nerve-wracking as the soldiers at checkpoints put guns up against the windows. It was quite clear they hated us.

‘It was then we were approached by a taxi driver, who said ‘I can get you in there, I can get you into Kirkuk’.

‘I thought ‘f***ing hell’, this is against everything I do, to be approached by a driver where hostage taking is still rife and ISIS are still in pockets in the mountains.

‘I asked: ‘How are you going to do this?’ And he said he would take us on back roads, behind people’s houses and through gardens. He said he’d done it before.

‘I was nervous, my heart was in my mouth for 20 minutes. We’d been turned away by Iraqi forces, and if we were caught, we could have been beaten or imprisoned for spying. We were in an area we weren’t supposed to be in.

‘We got into Kirkuk and had no problems at all and went to an area called Taza.

‘Taza is one kilometre from a place called Bashiir, which was on the frontline where I had been shot at by ISIS before.

‘All along the side of the road there were pictures of martyrs and posters with pictures of soldiers’ faces. I was looking to see if I could find anybody I knew.

‘This is when it became real for me. I might see a picture of someone I had been with.

A tattered ‘I love Mosul’ sign lies on the outskirts of the city. Andy says as he entered the city, his driver told him he would be disturbed

Andy came across a building that had been marked with an ‘n’ symbol by ISIS. He said: ‘What ISIS was doing was putting this “n” symbol on Christian houses, taking them and saying this building belongs to ISIS’ 

‘At the final checkpoint, leaving Taza, the soldiers knew all the guys in a picture I had of them. They pointed to one guy and said he had been killed.

‘There was a group of about four of five I spent most of my time with and he was one of them. I had given him money for a phone card and we had chatted about his life, his family, his village and how he was hoping to get back one day, but he never did.

‘I was standing on the road and I asked where he had been killed and they said, ‘on this road, a kilometre up’, so that kind of took my breath away a little bit.

‘I feel disappointed even now we didn’t make it to Bashiir, although I found out what happened to all of those guys I had been with.

‘I know that only one was killed out of the 12 people in the picture and I still want to see them again.

‘I promised them all on that frontline that day in 2016 that I would find them again, and I will keep to my promise.’

Next, Andy was ready to head to Mosul, where ISIS made its last stand.

Andy said: ‘Driving in from Iraq and Kurdistan, all the buildings were beautiful, and then it changed. I’ve never seen anything like it, it was like an apocalyptic film.

‘The buildings had big holes in them from where they had taken airstrikes. There were bits of rubble and then buildings that had been completely flattened.

Andy said: ‘The buildings had big holes in them from where they had taken airstrikes. There were bits of rubble and then buildings that had been completely flattened’ 

Andy poses with an Iraqi father and his family who survived the devastation in Mosul. The man had been watering a plant in the rubble amid the ruins of his home when he was approached by Andy 

‘Our driver told me I’d be disturbed.

‘We stopped at a restaurant where the waiters really didn’t want us there. The coffee was almost thrown on the table.

‘We were sat having our coffees and talking about the rules for what was going to happen today and Ammar pointed to a big hole across the road from where we were sitting.

‘He said that had been the insurance building where ISIS would throw homosexuals off.

‘I asked what would happen with the restaurant when this was happening, was it closed down?

‘But he said people with a hatred for homosexuals would sit and watch, drinking a coffee as people were being thrown off the large tower building.

‘I was in f***ing shock. I had read about that building and seen pictures in the press. But being that close, five or 10 metres away from where only a year and a half ago people were being thrown off it just for being gay…

‘Deeper into west Mosul, where the worst battles had taken place, there were Hashd on every corner. They are the local militia. They are dressed in black.

‘They are a bit like the SS. They’re not the Iraqi army and if they don’t like you, you’re f***ed.

‘We took the side roads and either side we could see where house-to-house battles had taken place.

‘There was black writing saying ‘this building belongs to ISIS, keep out’.

Andy and his tour guides are pictured in ruins close to where the River Tigris runs through Mosul 

‘There would be an ‘n’ symbol on some of the buildings. This was like the Nazis during World War II who would mark buildings where Jewish people lived.

‘What ISIS was doing was putting this ‘n’ symbol on Christian houses, taking them and saying this building belongs to ISIS.

‘They didn’t just label the houses, they dragged people out of them and killed them. They’d be shot and killed and then ISIS would take control of the building waiting for the final battle to come.’

The horrifying similarities between the Nazis and ISIS shocked Andy, who said the sheer devastation of the area was hard to take in.

He added: ‘We drove through the obliterated streets.

‘You could see plates of rotting food and then there was an opening.

‘The opening was a children’s playground and there was a children’s swing.

‘Ironically everything around this playground was smashed to s**t, apart from this swing.

‘I don’t know whether during the battle someone showed humanity and didn’t blow it up or the bombs just missed it.

‘While walking through the playground there was a house in front of me that had this beautiful window and door.

‘I walked up to it because something drew me in.

‘On the left-hand side of the building was a children’s nursery and I was in tears.

‘I’m a father and at that building, I was approached by someone who was a Christian who had stayed in Mosul and remained during the conflict.

‘She said to me they had taken four bodies out of that house the day before, three children and an adult. You could smell death.

‘We drove on to another square, which opened up, and there were items everywhere such as unused shells and RPGs.

‘There was evidence of just sheer mayhem and there were signs for unexploded bombs.

‘There was this building, which was surrounded by rubble and there was a Beko fridge with the door open.

Andy’s guide Ammar stands in an archway next to the River Tigris. He claims that the Iraqi army would drag ISIS fighters there and throw them into the water

While on his trip to Mosul, Andy was in constant danger of kidnapping, beatings from militia, and even death. Pictured is a rocket lying in the rubble 

‘I walked up to this fridge, and there was a man who owned the fridge who had come to water a plant.

‘He told me the reason he was watering it was because it was life.

‘I was standing on a mound of rubble outside his house and he said beneath your feet you’ve got the bodies of four or five ISIS fighters.

‘I was about to ask the man about his story when all of his family appeared.

‘He told me that they had lived there throughout the conflict in a basement below his house.

‘I asked him what it was like and he said he got shot between both legs but luckily the bullets passed through his body without hitting the bone.

‘He said every time there was fighting, people would run from one house to another.

‘His daughter had shrapnel in the back of her head and his other kids had bits of debris in their arms.

‘He was an air conditioning salesman and he explained how he wanted to get back to life.

‘But his house is on rented land and he said the Iraqi government won’t let him have the land back so he’s in a no-win situation.

‘He asked me if I was a father, and I said ‘yes I am’.

‘He told me as a father he had failed, and I said why? He said because he was supposed to protect his kids and he didn’t because they were all shot to pieces.

‘He said they are all alive but it was his job to look after his family.

‘I couldn’t accept that story and I gave him money. He didn’t want to take it and I feel embarrassed about it even now, because what was I doing? Buying his grief?

‘But the only thing I could think of was to give him money. He didn’t want to accept it because he was a proud man, but I gave it because he can’t even afford to rent a building to live in outside Mosul.

‘He obviously can’t sell anything. He’s got his air conditioning business but nothing to sell. I said I’ll visit him again and I will.

‘Can you imagine as a father all of your children being shot? His kids have seen death and bodies everywhere.’

Andy said the security guy they had with their group in west Mosul told him about the horrors the battle.

He said: ‘He told us there was this Canadian guy who was supposed to be a journalist, but who was really giving the signal for airstrikes.

‘He said in the end, the Iraqi army said they were losing too many men, and they decided they were just going to obliterate the area because they got fed up of fighting street to street.

‘We went to see the Al Noori Mosque where Abu Bakr Al Baghdadi declared Mosul as the caliphate of the Islamic State.

‘Ammar told me a story as he was there during the fighting.

‘He said during the battle he met a man one day with a little boy and they were by a mound. He asked the man what he was doing there.

‘The man told him he’d just buried his daughter, and he’d buried her himself.

In 2016 Andy narrowly escaped death after visiting the frontline in Bashiir, south of Kirkuk, where he spent time with Kurdish soldiers fighting ISIS (pictured) 

Andy and his wife Rachel back home in Surrey.  Andy says he still thinks about the people he met even though he is now back home 

‘His son was with him and he was writing with a yellow crayon. It was her favourite crayon and the boy was writing a goodbye to his sister.

‘Ammar said he saw the man the next day with another mound because the son had died, and he had dug another grave for him. These are the stories we don’t hear about.

‘He lost his son and his daughter all in two days and he buried them himself. He was digging that grave when all about there was fighting going on because the only ground he could find was near the mosque.

‘Ammar then took us to another area he said he wanted to show where he claimed there were war crimes.

‘There’s an arch near a bridge over the Tigris River between west and east Mosul.

‘The arch looks over to a deep drop and an embankment 20 or 30 foot down.

‘Ammar said the army would drag all the ISIS fighters there and throw them off the bridge or shoot them.

‘He said the Iraqi army did that to 10 to 15 ISIS fighters or who they presumed were ISIS fighters.

‘I asked Ammar how he felt about that and he said it was war.

‘I don’t agree with that. I don’t think you can just drag people and kill them. We remember that from the Second World War.

‘I don’t agree with ISIS. They are a disgraceful, despicable ideology, but equally, you can’t just drag people and shoot them if you’re declaring you’re the good people.’

Andy said the group travelled out of Mosul past a large hospital which had been destroyed. The huge building was one of the last places the ISIS fighters held.

Andy added: ‘I saw some horrendous things such as the bodies of people who had been killed.

‘But I don’t think about the bodies, I think of that one family, the man and his fridge and children, and my thoughts turn to my own family back home.

‘Since getting back, I still think of him and his family.’ 

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
Travel

Thomas Cook risks collapse plunging summer holiday bookings into turmoil as firm loses £1.5bn

THOMAS Cook risks collapse after its share price tumbled another 40 percent yesterday after losing nearly £1.5billion.

The UK's oldest travel company is struggling with massive debts and has seen its value plummet from £2.2bn to £180m in one year.

On Thursday, the firm issued a fresh profit warning and reported a half-year loss of almost £1.5bn after a goodwill write-off of £1.1bn, reports The Times.

Analysts at investment bank Citigroup yesterday branded their shares "worthless" and said they should be marked at zero.

Thomas Cook, which served 22 million customers last year, has debts of around £1.25bn.

News of the company's problems has caused panic among some of its customers.

On the Thomas Cook Facebook page, one traveller posted: "I'm flying to Menorca six weeks today. I hope the financial situation will be settled soon.

SHARES 'WORTHLESS'

Another said: "I just booked for next May to Turkey I really hope your not going into liquidation.

A third wrote: "Are you going into administration? because I have a holiday booked in October."

The company has struggled in recent years to keep up with changing habits of customers in the advent of the internet bookings including agregator sites which offer low prices for flights and hotels.

However, Thomas Cook boss Peter Fankhauser has blamed Brexit uncertiantly and last year's heatwave for the downturn in business.

He said: "The prolonged heatwave last summer and high prices in the Canaries reduced customer demand for winter sun, particularly in the Nordic region, while there is now little doubt that the Brexit process has led many UK customers to delay their holiday plans for this summer"

In February, the company put their airline business up for sale in a bid to raise some much-needed cash and reduce its debt.

Bosses are also carrying out cost-cutting measures including sacking 150 head office workers and closing 21 shops resulting in the loss of 320 retail jobs

Auditors Ernst & Young this week said there was "material uncertainty" around the sale of the firm's airline division.

However, while publishing its half-year results, the auditor said that the company, a British household name, should be able to stay afloat considering all the uncertainties it faces.

Thomas Cook said that all its holidays are ATOL-protected meaning customers will be able to get a refund if it collapses.

In a tweet, the firm wrote: "This announcement has no impact on future holidays or flight only bookings. All our holidays are fully ATOL-protected, so customers can continue to book with confidence."

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

Prince Harry risks environmentalists’ wrath by taking helicopter trip

Prince Harry risks environmentalists’ wrath by taking helicopter from London to Birmingham two days before ‘climate change’ speech to young people

  • On Wednesday at Wembley Harry praised youngsters for their attitudes to climate change, calling on people to stop damaging the environment
  • But two days earlier he took a helicopter flight from London to Birmingham
  • A first class train trip would have cost £34, the flight as much as £6000
  • Research has shown train travel produces 90 per cent less carbon emissions

The Duke of Sussex faces the prospect of accusations of hypocrisy for taking a private helicopter trip just two days before his Wembley Arena speech to youngsters about climate change.

Harry took the helicopter from London to Birmingham for two official engagements on Monday.

But two days later he and Meghan were on stage in the capital telling 12,000 young fans to ‘wake up’ and act ‘on the damaging impact our ways of living are having on the world’.

Last month the Duchess flew to a New York baby shower by private jet to the fury of environmentalists.

Harry and Meghan praised young people for their attitudes to climate change on Wednesday


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A spokesman for Friends of the Earth told MailOnline: ‘Private air travel obviously comes with a huge carbon footprint.

‘Perhaps for future trips the Duchess could consider less carbon intensive modes of travel. We invite her to set a good climate trend by flying less’.

Prince Harry had a number of alternatives for his trip, including a seat on the train from Euston to Birmingham New Street.

A first class ticket, booked in advance, costs just £34 and the train runs every 10 to 20 minutes, taking around 80 minutes to complete the journey.

But a helicopter charter between England’s first and second cities costs £6,000 to £6,500 and takes around three quarters of an hour.

On Monday Harry had two official engagements in Birmingham – including this memorial to the victims of the 2015 Tunisia terrorism – and flew by helicopter from London

The Duke of Sussex arrived by helicopter at Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham, to officially open a memorial dedicated to victims of the 2015 terror attacks in Tunisia

Research by Eurostar has found train travel saves between 70 and 90 percent of the carbon emissions of air travel over similar distances to the Duke’s journey.

During his three-hour visit to the Midlands, Harry visited a hospital and opened a memorial to the victims of the 2015 Tunisia terror attacks.

Then two days later at the Wembley event to mark WE Day — which celebrates young people making a difference in the world – he said: ‘Climate change is a humanitarian issue and one where we’ve been far too slow in waking up to the issues and acting on the damaging impact our ways of living are having on the world.

‘We now have the facts, the science, the technology and the ability to save not just our planet, but ourselves.’

He told the youngsters: ‘I know you don’t sit back and wait for solutions, you take action and create them.

‘Our world’s greatest assets are threatened every day . . . every forest, every river, every ocean, every coastline, every insect, every wild animal. Every blade of grass, every ray of sun is crucial to our survival.’

William and Kate routinely use helicopters for public duties. They took one to Blackpool on Wednesday. 

Kensington Palace told The Sun: ‘Travel decisions are based on a number of factors, including effective use of time, security and minimising the impact on others, while ensuring the full schedule can be delivered.’

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
Sport

Gary Neville risks infuriating Man Utd fans by telling Liverpool how to win the league

But he has run the risk of angering the Old Trafford faithful by giving their great rivals Liverpool some advice on how to win the Premier League title this season.

Speaking on his Sky Sports podcast, Neville told Martin Tyler that the Reds should forget about the Champions League so they can focus on their domestic games.

He said: “I’ve always thought that for Liverpool to win the league they have to have a clean fixture list.

"I’m gonna say it. Go out against Bayern Munich.

"That seems like madness. You can’t play to lose a game, but actually I think it’ll be in Liverpool’s favour if they can have a clean run."

“They can get everybody fresh, prepared for the rest of the season… City have got a couple of FA Cup (games) too, a quarter final and a semi-final potentially.

“Liverpool could go 4, 5 points in front.  That’s tough to pull back in the closing weeks. It is an advantage…. this is 50/50 still.”

Neville was making some sense – a team with fewer matches to play overall should have an advantage in trying to win the Premier League – but his giving helpful advice to the Merseyside club is unlikely to sit well with United fans.

Liverpool had been seven points ahead in the title race but their 0-0 draw with Everton at Goodison Park yesterday saw them drop a point behind Manchester City with nine games to play.

The Reds lag behind on goal difference too – City’s is at 56, while Liverpool are on 49.

Jurgen Klopp’s men now travel to Munich for the second leg of their Champions League round of 16 clash with Bayern – and Neville’s words could be ringing in their ears.

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World News

Red Cross warns US about risks of sending aid to Venezuela

Washington:  The International Committee of the Red Cross has warned the United States about the risks of delivering humanitarian aid to Venezuela without the approval of security forces loyal to President Nicolas Maduro.

Venezuela’s disputed president Nicolas Maduro flashes a V for Victory hand gesture after arriving at the Fort Tiuna military base in Caracas.Credit:AP

Opposition leader Juan Guaido has said he will defy Maduro's refusal to allow humanitarian aid by asking neighbouring nations to help send in large convoys of medicine and food. Guaido has declared himself interim president of the country.

The Trump administration has announced it is ready to deliver aid to Venezuela whenever and however is decided by Guaido.

Alexandra Boivin, ICRC delegation head for the United States and Canada, said on Friday that the ICRC had told US officials that whatever plans "they have to help the people of Venezuela, it has to be shielded from this political conversation."

"It is obviously a very difficult conversation to have with the US," she said. "We are there also to make clear the risks of the path being taken, the limits of our ability to operate in such an environment."

ICRC director of global operations Dominik Stillhart said the committee would only take part in such coordinated efforts if they are executed "with the agreement of the authorities, whoever the authorities are."

Stillhart said that the ICRC currently brings in its own medical supplies and emergency trauma care to support six hospitals located across the country.

"We are not kind of an implementing agency for any donor, specifically not to implement things that have a political tone," he said.

The Geneva-based organisation is currently in talks with the Venezuelan Ministry of Health to expand its budget in the South American country to at least $US20 million.

A supporter of Venezuela’s President Nicolas Maduro holds a homemade poster featuring images of Venezuela’s late President Hugo Chaves and Maduro, with the message: “Yankee Go Home”, during a rally outside the Miraflores presidential palace, in Caracas.Credit:AP

The expanded budget would provide increased support to high risk areas on the Venezuela-Colombia border and address a recent resurgence of malaria in the state of Bolivar, along the southern border with Brazil.

"We are not taking any side. Regardless of the political situation, our focus will always be on what we can do," Stillhart said.

ICRC will also dedicate $35 million to Colombia to assist in areas where former FARC rebels maintained a presence and to care for more than three million Venezuelans who have fled the economic crisis in their country.

AP

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Sport

Jose Mourinho risks FA rap for pinky finger gesture… amid claims Manchester United boss is mocking small manhood

His comments into a TV camera in Portuguese are already being investigated by the governing body.


The Manchester United boss has made this gesture on three occasions — and it is widely interpreted as suggesting that someone is less than well-endowed.

Mourinho pointed it at the camera on his way off the pitch following the 3-2 comeback win over Newcastle on Saturday.

He also shout­ed “fodas filhos de puta”, which translates as “f*** off sons of b*****s”.

That was seen as a direct message to his critics including TV pundit Paul Scholes, who has attacked Mourinho’s reign.


Old Trafford legend Scholes has even accused Mourinho of EMBARRASSING the club.

And Mourinho believes Scholes and Rio Ferdinand are part of what he calls a “manhunt” against him.

He was asked on Saturday what the finger gesture meant and said: “Is a finger. Is a finger smaller than the others. Is a finger.”

While it will be tough to prove what he meant, it was interesting that he used it in anger during that foul-mouthed rant on Saturday.

Some fans on social media are convinced it refers to "little men".

Mourinho also made the gesture after their 0-0 draw with Valencia — and at snappers from his car ahead of the Toon game.

Discussing United’s 3-1 loss at West Ham before Saturday’s game, Scholes rapped: “I am surprised he survived, the performance was so bad.

“I think his mouth is out of control and he’s embarrassing the club.”

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Sport

Gareth Bale risks falling out with Ronaldo by claiming Real Madrid have more team spirit WITHOUT him

Ronaldo, 33, won four Champions Leagues, two La Liga titles, the Copa del Rey, Spanish Super Cup and FOUR Ballons d'Or in Madrid before joining Juventus this summer.

But Bale claims the Real team is more "relaxed" without their old talisman.

He told the Daily Mail: "Obviously it's going to be a little different from having such a big player there.

"It's maybe a bit more relaxed, yes. I suppose there is more of a team, more working as one unit rather than one player."

Bale was not a guaranteed starter under Zinedine Zidane last season but has flourished under new boss Julen Lopetegui, scoring three league goals in four games.


The Welshman admits being able to speak English with Lopetegui has made life easier.

He said: "Obviously it helps.

"In Spanish I can talk (to a manager) but maybe not go into that amount of detail with them that I would need to.

When asked whether he considers Lopetegui a better manager than Zidane, he said: "I'm not sure I want to answer that."

While Bale is thriving, Ronaldo has endured a difficult start to the season at Juventus.

He got off the mark yesterday with two goals against Sassuolo but admitted he was suffering from anxiety due to his three-game duck.

Ronaldo said: "I was a little bit anxious as expectations were high. I really wanted to score, so I'm happy.

"Of course, there was attention after my arrival in Turin, but life is like that.

"I'm happy. I'm working well and my team-mates help me to adapt to this championship."

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TV & Movies

'Keep taking risks': Tom Ballard's plea to ABC bosses

Tom Ballard has issued a rallying cry to ABC executives: back subversive comedy, or risk dumbing-down public debate.

The comedian issued his plea on Thursday night during Tonightly's final episode. The program was axed last month, with the ABC arguing a different approach was required in order to chase younger audiences.

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"The world is a very scary place," Ballard said during his final piece-to-camera. "We need comedy [and] we need satire to start this conversation.

"I think the ABC's incredible. We are so lucky to have made this show at all. I'm sad it's ending now, but it just couldn't have happened anywhere else. Maybe at SBS, perhaps, on half the budget. We have to value the ABC. It's under threat at the moment. Please defend it and cherish it."

But it wasn't all a public broadcasting love-in. Ballard also had some choice words for ABC bosses.

"End Tonightly, that's fine," he said. "Nobody deserves a TV show… But please, please, please do not stop making things like this.

"Please do not stop making risky and subversive and fun and batshit crazy and boundary-pushing shit like Tonightly. Particularly stuff for young people. Keep taking risks. It's not happening anywhere else on mainstream, free-to-air Australian television."

Tom Ballard has signed off from Tonightly for the final time.

Tom Ballard has signed off from Tonightly for the final time.

The comedian also hit-back at suggestions Tonightly only became funny after the ABC announced it wouldn't be renewed for the third time. Some commentators have argued the show's content has become edgier in recent weeks, pointing to a scathing skit by Jazz Twemlow that took aim at left-wing politics and social media outrage.

"We've been out here for a while doing weird shit [since last year]," Ballard said. "It's just no one was watching."

Tonightly was axed in August. The announcement came just days after the TV watchdog cleared the program of any wrongdoing over an old skit that saw a conservative politician labelled a "c—".

"Tonightly deliberately pushed boundaries to inform and entertain," an ABC spokesman said at the time. "We are proud of the program and its role in supporting some of Australia's best emerging comedy talent.

"Our thanks go to the very talented  team members for their hard work and dedication in producing a complex and cracking show in quick time, over some 150 episodes. We look forward to working with them again in the future."

The ABC has axed a string of programs featuring Australian comedians in recent months, including The Checkout and Chris Taylor's Screen Time.

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Celebrities

SEBASTIAN SHAKESPEARE: Lady Victoria Hervey risks wrath of the Vatican

SEBASTIAN SHAKESPEARE: Lady Victoria Hervey risks the wrath of the Vatican over ‘putting her eggs on ice’, says family priest Lady Victoria Hervey has never been one to shy away from publicity, and in January the socialite announced that she was ‘putting her eggs on ice’. But now one of her family’s favourite priests,
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World News

Stuntwoman risks her life by KISSING America’s ‘largest alligator’

Looking for a prince? Stuntwoman risks her life by patting and KISSING America’s ‘largest alligator’ on his snout Stuntwoman Rachel Withers, 31, from Rock Hill, South Carolina, puckered up Daredevil crouches down and kisses the 13 feet long alligator on its long snout She admits it was the most dangerous stunt she has
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Lifestyle

Royal Ascot racegoers who took fashion risks

It’s all hats… and tatts! Ascot racegoers showcase inkings, plunging necklines and VERY outlandish head wear that prove not all fashion risks pay off Ladies’ Day at Royal Ascot saw glamorous women take risks in the style stakes But these photos show that not every bold fashion statement quite hit the mark Some women
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World News

Theresa May risks new row with Donald Trump ahead of visit to UK by suggesting his immigration policy is inhumane

The comments were made in the wake of reports hundreds of children were being kept in cages by the US border patrol following the President's “zero-tolerance” crackdown on illegal immigration. The Prime Minister's official spokesman pointedly noted that the UK's own immigration policy has a “very clear
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World News

Major US military exercises with S.Korea ‘suspended indefinitely’

Trump administration officially suspends August war games with South Korea ‘indefinitely’ after surprising his own Pentagon with announcement in Singapore The president had surprised people in his own administration by saying in Singapore that ‘provocative’ war games with South Korea would end The move is a significan
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Sport

Perez risks a nation's wrath for cheap deal

It was only 17 days ago that Florentino Perez claimed that he had won as many Champions League titles – five – as the greatest name in his team, Cristiano Ronaldo, and since then, it is hard to think of much that has gone right for Real Madrid's all-powerful president. Zinedine Zidane, his three-straight Champion
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Sport

Dragons taking no risks with Denver duo Widdop and Graham

St George Illawarra will send its strength and conditioning guru as a chaperone for potential England call-ups Gareth Widdop and James Graham for the historic Test in Denver in a bid to ensure a record representative contingent doesn’t derail the club's title ambitions. Bracing for the loss of its four State of O
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World News

Theresa May’s right-hand man risks enraging Brexiteers by refusing to say whether Britain will be out of the EU customs union by 2022

Ahead of tomorrow’s crunch Commons votes on the EU withdrawal bill, David Lidington would only say it was the PM’s “intention” and his “hope” he backstop deal on customs will be over by the next scheduled General Election four years from now. But just minutes later the housing minister Dominic Raab – a leading Brexit
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World News

Dramatic moment women risks life by fighting off a gun-wielding thug

Dramatic moment a women risks her life by fighting off a gun-wielding thug who was wrestling her for her handbag CCTV was captured outside a shop in São José do Rio Preto, south east Brazil The thug got away with cash from the till plus the victim’s car keys and purse He headbutted her and hit her with the stump of th
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World News

Men who secretly have sex with other men 'underestimate the risks of contracting HIV'

A University of Edinburgh study claimed that public health messages should be targeted specifically at this "neglected" group. According to the research team, the men tend to mix with, and acquire infection from, each other and not from openly-gay men. Potentially fearful of stigmatisation or prejudice, they
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World News

Top mobile firms are hiding potential cancer risks from customers

Top mobile firms including EE, Nokia and Vodafone are telling shareholders about potential cancer risks of phones while hiding the threat from customers Mobile phone firms have warned their shareholders of potential links to cancer However there is no evidence to suggest that they have told their customers  Nokia clai
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TV & Movies

Jimmy Kimmel Risks Reigniting Sean Hannity Feud Over Shapeshifters, Lizard People and Melania Trump

The late-night host believes Hannity and other Fox News “dummies” would back Trump even if he claims Robert Mueller is a shapeshifting lizard from outer space. Jimmy Kimmel risked reigniting his feud with Sean Hannity on Monday night when he took the Fox News pundit, and the rest of the network, to task for seemingly
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World News

Police facial recognition used to help catch criminals questioned

Police facial recognition system which is used to help catch criminals ‘risks damaging public trust and could be unlawful’ Police CCTV system which scans faces for criminals in crowds could be unlawful  Facial recognition technology (FRT) has come under fire from a watchdog The independent Information Commissioner has
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TV & Movies

Hollyoaks' Damon Kinsella risks losing Holly Cunningham thanks to a risky poker bet tonight

Hollyoaks ‘ Damon Kinsella risks losing Holly Cunningham forever when a big gamble doesn’t pay off tonight (May 11). Damon (Jacob Roberts) has been trying to get Holly (Amanda Clapham) back and thinks he can win her over with an offer to whisk her away on a Venice holiday. When Holly once again turns him down, hapless
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World News

Universal Credit is punishing the self-employed and risks 'crushing' entrepreneurs and start-ups, MPs warn

Workers whose income changes month by month could be missing out on hundreds of pounds by the way their benefits is calculated, a fresh report out today says. MPs on the influential Work and Pensions Committee said that the system was failing the self-employed, who make up around a sixth of Britain's workforce. A
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TV & Movies

Selena Gomez risks ruining Met Gala white gown as she overloads the bronzer on red carpet

The singer, 25, dazzled on the red carpet in New York in a sheer Coach dress made from vintage cream silk gauze and featuring intricate lace and metal stud detailing. But fans on social media questioned whether her make-up artist had gone a little OTT with the bronzer brush, resulting in her face looking much more tan
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Celebrities

Jessica Chastain risks her life to paint portrait of Sitting Bull

She’s considered one of today’s finest female thespians. And Jessica Chastain proved her acting chops as she dove into the character of Caroline Wheldon for the American biographical drama Woman Walks Ahead. The 41-year-old plays a portrait artist from New York who travels to Dakota to paint legendary Hunkpapa Lakota ….

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Health

Why light at night has long term risks for children – and even fetuses in the womb

A new scientific study shows that bright electric light exposure of preschool children in the evening suppresses melatonin production almost completely, an important addition to the growing body of research in this area.  Melatonin suppression is a marker of disruption of our circadian rhythms. Ten….

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Health

Contracting mono as a child raises autoimmune disease risks later in life

The mono virus – commonly known as the ‘kissing disease’ – raise the risks of at least seven diseases, by sticking to human DNA, according to new breakthrough research  Between 80 and 95 percent of Americans get mono over their lifetime, which may raise their risks for immune-related diseases like ….

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